Illinois Auctioneer Wins 2017 World Livestock Auctioneer Championship

Kansas City, Mo. – Brian Curless of Pittsfield, Ill., proved his world-class talent as a livestock auctioneer at the 54th annual World Livestock Auctioneer Championship (WLAC), presented by the Livestock Marketing Association (LMA). Public Auction Yards, Billings, Mont., hosted the contest on Saturday, June 17.
Curless was raised in the livestock marketing industry, but did not originally have any interest in becoming an auctioneer. During his mid-20s, Curless recognized the need for livestock auctioneers as the population of current auctioneers was aging.
The newly crowned Champion notes Jack Lowderman and Bob Evans as personal mentors, while recognizing other auctioneers like Stanley Stout and the 1987 WLAC Champion, Jeff Stokes, as “heroes” in the livestock auctioneering world.
This year’s champion takes home a customized 2017 Ford F-150 truck to use during the year of his reign; $5,000 cash; a championship bronze sculpture; world champion Gist belt buckle and a hand-tooled leather briefcase from LMA; world champion ring sponsored by Public Auction Yards; the Golden Gavel Award sponsored by the World Wide College of Auctioneering; and a James Reid, Ltd. money clip sponsored by CattleUSA.com.
Curless was sponsored by Fairview Sale Barn, Fairview, Ill.; F&T Livestock, Palmyra, Mo.; and Kirksville Livestock, LLC.
A special WLAC show will air on RFD-TV June 26 beginning at 8:00 p.m. eastern. The 2010 World Livestock Auctioneer Champion, Kyle Shobe, will host the show, and a special segment will highlight the 70th anniversary of the LMA.
Other Awards Received
Cody Lowderman from Macomb, Ill., earned Reserve Champion honors, and Will Epperly from Dunlap, Iowa, was named Runner-up Champion.
As Reserve Champion, Lowderman received $2,000 cash, a Gist knife and reserve champion Gist belt buckle from LMA. Additionally, Lowderman was named the 2017 Audrey K. Banks “Rookie of the Year” and was awarded $500 cash by LMA, in recognition of an impressive display of talent at his first WLAC competition. The Reserve Champion and Rookie of the Year also won the award for High Interview score. Doing so, he received $1,000 cash and a hand-tooled leather padfolio from the LMA. Lowderman was sponsored by Carthage Livestock, Inc.
In addition to Curless, Lowderman and Epperly, the 2017 WLAC finalists were Colton Brantley, Clovis, Calif.; Mike Godberson, Pawnee, Okla.; Brennin Jack, Prince Albert, Sask.; Jacob Massey, Petersburg, Tenn.; Justin Mebane, Bakersfield, Calif.; Jared Miller, Leon, Iowa; and Russele Sleep, Bedford, Iowa. All received Gist belt buckles from LMA.
WLAC Qualification and Scoring
Thirty of the semi-finalists were selected during three regional qualifying events that took place at LMA member-markets in the U.S. As the International Auctioneer Champion is always given a “bye” to become an automatic semi-finalist, Corey Lawrence qualified as the champion from Calgary Stampede’s International Livestock Auctioneer Championship in Canada.
When not on the auction block at the livestock market he regularly sells at, Curless will spend his year traveling the country sharing his auctioneering skills with other livestock auction markets, and acting as a spokesperson for the industry. Therefore, each semi-finalist had an opportunity to establish their knowledge of the livestock marketing business, and their ability to express that knowledge with clarity, in a judged interview session on Friday of the championship.

Omaha Packing Plant Sends Boxed Beef To China

By Chris Clayton
DTN Ag Policy Editor

With a little fanfare from Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts, the packing plant Greater Omaha Packing sent the first load of boxed beef from Omaha to China on June 14 after 14 years of being shut out of the market.
“Nebraska is the country’s top beef processor as well as beef exporter, and China is the second-largest importer of beef in the world,” Ricketts said. “From the beginning, my administration focused trade efforts on China to position Nebraska beef to be able to capture significant sales as soon as the market opened.”
After 14 years, the beef market to China was finally formally reopened on June 12 as USDA released the final protocols that packers had to meet.
Greater Omaha Packing, which already exports to 69 countries, had spent months helping develop the relationship to send beef to China. Last September, a delegation from China toured the Greater Omaha Packing facilities, which helped pave the way for the company to start planning for the reopening of the market.
China imported about $2.6 billion in beef last year. Industry leaders expect to see a tremendous growth market for U.S. beef exports in mainland China.
“China has the potential to be the largest export market for U.S. beef,” said Henry Davis, president of Greater Omaha Packing. “There is a tremendous amount of opportunity there.”
Davis noted the Chinese market is a very different dynamic than when the U.S. was shut out in 2003. The middle class has grown and there will likely be a lot of enthusiasm for U.S. beef.
“There is a lot of wealth over there and their consumers are excited,” Davis said.
Ricketts and Nebraska Agriculture Director Greg Ibach said the exports have the opportunity to provide a lift for farmers and ranchers in the state.
Davis told DTN his sales team has received hundreds of calls over the past several months from potential customers looking to export to China. He also added sales staff that was bilingual as well.
“Being that we ship all over the world, we are familiar with shipping techniques to different countries and how to facilitate that,” Davis said.
Greater Omaha Packing and a Tyson Foods plant in Lexington, Nebraska, are the only plants thus far approved for beef exports to China, according to USDA’s eligible supplier list.
Davis declined to say exactly how much was sent on June 14, but he said the volume was significant enough to go to several different locations. “We don’t know exactly where the beef is going to end up,” Davis said.
Greater Omaha Packing processes up to 2,400 head a day and had sales last year of about $1.7 billion.

USDA-NASS May Be Contacting Some Oklahoma Stocker Cattle Producers

By Donald Stotts

Stillwater, Okla. – Oklahoma cattle producers who received the Oklahoma State University Stocker Survey from the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service recently but who have not returned it will soon be receiving a call from NASS to help them complete the survey.
OSU’s Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, in cooperation with the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service and USDA-NASS is conducting the first-of-its kind survey to gather previously unavailable information on the procurement and assembly of stocker cattle, production and management practices and variability, and marketing practices of stocker producers.
DASNR agricultural economists Derrell Peel and Kellie Raper have reported a sample of responses thus far has been “very encouraging and will provide unprecedented information about the vital stocker industry in Oklahoma.”
“We are excited about the possibilities this data will open up for us to understand and provide help and insight for Oklahoma cattle producers,” said Peel, who is the state’s OSU Cooperative Extension livestock marketing specialist. “We’re very grateful to producers who take the time to provide this information on a sector of the cattle industry that is not well understood.”
The importance of stocker producers in Oklahoma’s economy is known to be significant, but just how significant?
“Nobody really likes filling out a survey but this one is pretty important in regards to what it means to Oklahoma’s stocker cattle industry,” Peel said. “Not only will it provide detailed information to help researchers and industry analysts understand the vital economic role of the stocker industry, it will provide insight into such things as the disease threats associated with cattle movement into and out of stocker production.”
As stocker cattle operators can readily attest, stocker or backgrounding provides vital production and marketing system values to the beef industry. Stocker production happens in a wide variety of different situations and environments in many regions of the country.
“This illustrates the critical role of the stocker sector in providing flexibility to enhance beef industry competitiveness, including adjusting production in response to feed and forage market changes, enhancing the quality of feeder cattle by adding weight and age to stocker cattle, and regulating the flow of cattle from cow-calf production to the feedlots,” Peel said.
In essence, the stocker cattle sector acts in part as an essential shock absorber for the beef industry. Unfortunately, to date little data exists to fully understand and analyze the varied activities and actions that make up the stocker sector. Stocker production occurs year around in Oklahoma, utilizing a wide variety of native and introduced pastures.
“An inventory snapshot once or maybe twice a year does not capture the flow of animals through stocker production systems” Raper said. “Additionally, we have only very coarse estimates of the movement of cattle around the country before and after stocker production.”
The Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service is one of two state agencies administered by DASNR, and one of the three equal parts in OSU’s state and federally mandated teaching, research and Extension land-grant mission.
Oklahoma is the nation’s fifth-leading producer of cattle and calves, according to USDA-NASS statistics.

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 68,000

Texas 36,700. 96 pct over 600 lbs. 48 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current part load 675 lbs 159.00; 700-750 lbs (732) 155.78; 750-775 lbs (770) 156.00; 800-835 lbs (812) 153.11; 855-860 lbs (860) 143.84; July load 725 lbs 157.15; 750-775 lbs (759) 155.57; Aug few loads 725 lbs 155.50; 750-775 lbs (761) 155.50; load 825 lbs 150.50; Sept few load 635 lbs 166.85; few loads 700 lbs 161.30; 750-775 lbs (770) 153.90; Del July load 825 lbs 151.50; Aug 650-675 lbs (666) 166.55; few loads 700 lbs 163.00; few loads 750 lbs 157.10; load 825 lbs 151.50; Sept few loads 625 lbs 171.50; few loads 700 lbs 162.25; 750-775 lbs (760) 158.18; 800-825 lbs (805) 153.04; Oct 750-775 lbs (755) 153.88; 800825 lbs (805) 153.10. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current several loads 625 lbs 169.91; few loads 650 lbs 158.27; 750-795 lbs (768) 149.19; 800-835 lbs (824) 142.34; 850-851 lbs (850) 149.10; few loads 925 lbs 136.92; June-July load 640 lbs 164.54; 775-785 lbs (778) 150.83; few loads 800 lbs 148.07; July load 750 lbs 148.90; Del Current part load 450 lbs 176.00 Mex; several loads 575 lbs 167.10 Mex; load 775 lbs 145.00; 800-830 lbs (805) 148.16; few loads 900 lbs 146.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current load 625 lbs 156.00; few loads 675 lbs 150.00; 700-725 lbs (725) 149.62; few loads 750 lbs 147.00; July several loads 675 lbs 148.78; few loads 750 lbs 143.00; Aug few loads 675 lbs 150.50; 700-725 lbs (724) 148.91; Sept 700-725 lbs (719) 148.21; load 750 lbs 143.50; Oct load 725 lbs 144.00; Del July several loads 725 lbs 147.35; several loads 750 lbs 147.94; Aug few loads 650 lbs 156.60; 700-725 lbs (721) 151.24; several loads 750 lbs 147.94; Sept 700-725 lbs (702) 151.57; 750-775 lbs (772) 145.76; few loads 800 lbs 142.00; Oct load 650 lbs 151.15; 700-725 lbs (713) 146.25; load 750 lbs 145.50; Nov 700-725 lbs (716) 145.60. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current few loads 625 lbs 153.25; 715-740 lbs (731) 141.78; few loads 750 lbs 133.97; Del Current several loads 575 lbs 154.50 Mex; load 625 lbs 153.00; load 700 lbs 152.00; load 750 lbs 138.00; July load 625 lbs 146.50 Mex; load 700 lbs 137.50; Sept load 700 lbs 140.00; Oct several loads 650 lbs 142.00 Mex.

Oklahoma 6300. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 56 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current few loads 760 lbs 156.79; several loads 830 lbs 151.79; Aug load 650 lbs 167.15; few loads 700 lbs 159.50; Sept few loads 625 lbs 168.50; few loads 700 lbs 158.75; few loads 800 lbs 149.75; Del Current several loads 850 lbs 150.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current several loads 870 lbs 147.29; July load 825 lbs 148.50; Aug load 825 lbs 148.50; Sept 825 lbs 148.50; Oct few loads 750 lbs 152.10; Oct load 825 lbs 148.50. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current several loads 725 lbs 144.25; July few loads 725 lbs 142.75; load 750 lbs 142.50; Aug several loads 725 lbs 146.64; Aug load 750 lbs 142.50; Sept several loads 400 lbs 148.18; 750-775 lbs (772) 142.33; Oct 700-725 lbs (716) 143.24; load 750 lbs 142.50; Nov 700-725 lbs (715) 142.95. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Oct few loads 700 lbs 141.80; Nov load 725 lbs 139.80.

New Mexico 2000. 42 pct over 600 lbs. 38 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Aug few loads 750 lbs 155.60. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current load 450 lbs 170.00 Mex; several loads 575 lbs 161.50 Mex; load 775 lbs 143.02; few loads 800 lbs 145.48. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current several loads 575 lbs 148.50 Mex; Sept few loads 800 lbs 140.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current load 750 lbs 136.02; July load 625 lbs 140.50 Mex.

Kansas 800. 100 pct over 600 lbs. No heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current several loads 800 lbs 159.00; Oct few loads 800 lbs 151.00. Medium and Large 1 Del Current load 835 lbs 149.00; July load 750 lbs 153.00; Sept load 700 lbs 143.00.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — June 9
National feeder cattle receipts: 177,700

Yearling steers and heifers sold steady to $8 higher. Steer and heifers calves traded steady to $5 higher. Feeder steers and heifers in the southeast sold $2-5 higher. Trade was active on good to very good demand. The major livestock markets were back in business posting huge gains after being closed last Monday in observance of the Memorial Day holiday. Oklahoma City and Joplin Stockyards saw feeders $5-12 higher compared to two weeks ago. This was expected as the markets had to play catch up and digest all the positive news from the week before. Other sale barns running on a limited schedule saw heavier receipts than usual as producers are trying to take advantage of the higher market. The CME feeder cattle futures closed Monday in the green at $159.87 for the August contract, fueling buyers to pay more for feeders. However, the futures were down the limit on June 6 closing at $155.37 causing some uneasiness in the cattle industry. There was some evidence that the sharp turn in the futures affected a few cattle markets during the middle of the week. However, most traders shook-off the negative news and continued to purchase yearlings at higher prices as feedlots are trying to keep up with packer demand and keep pen space full. June 2 Ft. Pierre, SD hosted the 20th Annual World Livestock Auctioneer Championship contest with almost 12,000 head of cattle on hand. Some of the highlights reported were 86 head of fancy steers weighing 642 lbs selling for $199.50 cwt. Also over 400 head of steers weighing 670 lbs averaged $184.07 and 262 head weighing 726 lbs averaged at $175.08 cwt. At Tri-State Livestock in McCook, NE 300 head of mostly black steers weighing 920 lbs sold for $158.75 per cwt and in Green City, MO 136 head of steers averaging 828 lbs bring $166.43 cwt. In the southern plains and southern Midwest, where you see more yearling crossbred cattle with exotic influence, the price margins have narrowed between the medium and large 1 and 12 feeders. This is due to the fact that these type of cattle can go anywhere this time of year due to warmer temperatures. Very few sales of slaughter cattle have been reported at the time of this report as feedlots are holding their ground. A few live sales in Nebraska sold at $136 and dressed at $218 while in the southern plains trade has been at a standstill. The Choice-Select spread continues to widen posting another record at $30.92 on June 9. Choice boxed-beef closed June 9 $5.97 higher at $251.21 with Select $2.23 higher at $220.29 when compared to June 2 close. Extreme heat plagued parts of the Plains and Midwest with temperatures topping in the mid 90’s which slowed cattle movement in some areas. Corn planting is mostly complete and hay cutting is kicking into high gear with plenty of sunshine and no rain in the forecast.

Texas 8000. 74 pct over 600 lbs. 48 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (327) 190.21; 350-400 lbs (367) 172.97; 400-450 lbs (422) 166.96; 450-500 lbs (479) 175.39; 500-550 lbs (518) 165.63; 550-600 lbs (567) 167.86; 600-650 lbs (636) 159.12; 650-700 lbs (677) 157.34; 700-750 lbs (733) 155.94; 750-800 lbs (757) 155.53; 800-850 lbs (818) 152.71; 850-900 lbs (869) 144.82; 900-950 lbs (919) 135.63; 1000-1050 lbs (1020) 128.48. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (385) 166.73; 500-550 lbs (533) 156.56; 550-600 lbs (579) 159.47; 600-650 lbs (635) 150.08; 650-700 lbs (677) 149.46; 700-750 lbs (720) 145.61; 750-800 lbs (783) 152.70; 800-850 lbs (804) 145.83; 900-950 lbs (926) 134.85. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (329) 163.23; 350-400 lbs (358) 167.13; 450-500 lbs (465) 153.75; 500-550 lbs (519) 155.11; 550-600 lbs (571) 149.57; 600-650 lbs (626) 149.13; 650-700 lbs (687) 143.46; 700-750 lbs (730) 145.57; 750-800 lbs (780) 137.59; 800-850 lbs (824) 135.75; 850-900 lbs (873) 130.25; 900-950 lbs (925) 127.11. Medium and Large 1-2 450-500 lbs (474) 149.04; 500-550 lbs (518) 148.35; 550-600 lbs (568) 145.87; 600-650 lbs (617) 137.61; 650-700 lbs (669) 146.45; 700-750 lbs (746) 144.75; 750-800 lbs (792) 133.12; 800-850 lbs (811) 131.48; 850-900 lbs (892) 124.97.

Oklahoma 27,500. 71 pct over 600 lbs. 40 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (322) 217.22; 350-400 lbs (377) 208.52; 400-450 lbs (421) 182.97; 450-500 lbs (473) 179.47; 500-550 lbs (518) 177.48; 550-600 lbs (573) 169.99; 600-650 lbs (617) 170.14; 650-700 lbs (666) 162.22; 700-750 lbs (717) 162.18; 750-800 lbs (774) 157.95; 800-850 lbs (829) 153.33; 850-900 lbs (870) 151.52; 900-950 lbs (920) 147.52; 950-1000 lbs (983) 141.55; 1000-1050 lbs (1024) 137.22. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (324) 196.69; 350-400 lbs (362) 190.50; 400-450 lbs (436) 178.65; 450-500 lbs (473) 169.49; 500-550 lbs (522) 166.17; 550-600 lbs (571) 163.73; 600-650 lbs (619) 163.51; 650-700 lbs (672) 157.10; 700-750 lbs (738) 154.95; 750-800 lbs (782) 151.75; 800-850 lbs (815) 148.04; 850-900 lbs (866) 145.90; 900-950 lbs (922) 142.53; 950-1000 lbs (971) 137.52. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (326) 177.39; 350-400 lbs (372) 170.14; 400-450 lbs (423) 171.14; 450-500 lbs (472) 163.00; 500-550 lbs (525) 156.91; 550-600 lbs (571) 157.94; 600-650 lbs (625) 154.94; 650-700 lbs (678) 150.04; 700-750 lbs (731) 147.24; 750-800 lbs (772) 143.29; 800-850 lbs (823) 139.37; 850-900 lbs (873) 136.63; 900-950 lbs (921) 130.60; 950-1000 lbs (967) 125.80. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (328) 171.18; 350-400 lbs (373) 167.93; 400-450 lbs (430) 160.82; 450-500 lbs (481) 157.73; 500-550 lbs (532) 153.48; 550-600 lbs (576) 152.03; 600-650 lbs (631) 150.73; 650-700 lbs (631) 150.73; 700-750 lbs (740) 144.57; 750-800 lbs (779) 139.68; 800-850 lbs (834) 135.44; 850-900 lbs (865) 133.59.

New Mexico 2000. 35 pct over 600 lbs. 39 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 450-500 lbs (475) 178.55. Medium and Large 1-2 700-750 lbs (716) 151.61; 800-850 lbs (830) 141.22. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (422) 181.36. Medium and Large 1-2 500-550 lbs (522) 162.96.

Kansas 4900. 97 pct over 600 lbs. 37 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (360) 190.00; 550-600 lbs (578) 169.62; 600-650 lbs (617) 167.00; 650-700 lbs (679) 164.89. Medium and Large 1-2 650-700 lbs (676) 160.27; 700-750 lbs (745) 156.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (413) 165.28; 600-650 lbs (614) 162.50; 650-700 lbs (668) 147.00; 700-750 lbs (721) 147.55; 750-800 lbs (751) 147.00; 800-850 lbs (843) 141.40; 850-900 lbs (850) 141.50; 950-1000 lbs (958) 133.50.

Missouri 42,800. 47 pct over 600 lbs. 39 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (329) 203.34; 350-400 lbs (369) 197.70; 400-450 lbs (429) 198.18; 450-500 lbs (477) 187.83; 500-550 lbs (530) 182.87; 550-600 lbs (574) 177.02; 600-650 lbs (623) 172.57; 650-700 lbs (670) 164.26; 700-750 lbs (718) 161.29; 750-800 lbs (774) 159.87; 800-850 lbs (830) 158.63; 850-900 lbs (875) 153.99; 900-950 lbs (918) 150.83; 1000-1050 lbs (1034) 138.85; load 1055 lbs 135.50. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (324) 199.04; 350-400 lbs (375) 185.75; 400-450 lbs (430) 183.07; 450-500 lbs (476) 177.84; 500-550 lbs (526) 169.44; 550-600 lbs (574) 166.03; 600-650 lbs (622) 162.74; 650-700 lbs (677) 157.96; 700-750 lbs (724) 156.91; 750-800 lbs (772) 153.60; 800-850 lbs (824) 149.72; 850-900 lbs (869) 144.74; 900-950 lbs (934) 136.95. Holsteins: Large 3 pkg 650 lbs 81.00; 850-900 lbs (883) 79.26. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (331) 175.40; 350-400 lbs (374) 170.95; 400-450 lbs (432) 169.69; 450-500 lbs (478) 164.28; 500-550 lbs (525) 159.99; 550-600 lbs (575) 155.66; 600-650 lbs (619) 155.75; 650-700 lbs (670) 152.61; 700-750 lbs (725) 145.93; 750-800 lbs (767) 140.69; 800-850 lbs (809) 141.51. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (334) 174.17; 350-400 lbs (378) 167.68; 400-450 lbs (422) 159.65; 450-500 lbs (477) 157.69; 500-550 lbs (524) 151.81; 550-600 lbs (573) 150.53; 600-650 lbs (624) 145.89; 650-700 lbs (671) 143.93; 700-750 lbs (720) 143.42; 750-800 lbs (769) 137.46; 800-850 lbs (823) 135.79; 850-900 lbs (870) 130.71.

Arkansas 10,000. 22 pct over 600 lbs. 41 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (323) 197.57; 350-400 lbs (372) 185.55; 400-450 lbs (422) 177.98; 450-500 lbs (476) 171.13; 500-550 lbs (523) 170.71; 550-600 lbs (573) 164.53; 600-650 lbs (623) 159.53; 650-700 lbs (664) 154.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (325) 171.12; 350-400 lbs (371) 167.43; 400-450 lbs (423) 159.78; 450-500 l6s(475) 156.43; 500-550 lbs (519) 149.65; 550-600 lbs (568) 145.84; 600-650 lbs (623) 141.69; 650-700 lbs (673) 138.15.

 

 

 

 

 

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Thursday, June 22, 2017 3:22 PM