John Deere Buys New Equipment For Lease Program

(Dow Jones) – Deere and Co. is spending billions of dollars annually to buy its own equipment for a leasing program, which lifts sales of new farm tractors and construction machinery but adds financial complexity and weighs on the used-equipment market.
The world’s largest manufacturer of farm equipment has leaned on its financing business in recent years to combat declining demand for new machinery at a time of unprecedented stress in the U.S. Farm Belt because of the trade war and bad weather.
Transaction records show that more than one-third of the financed purchases of Deere high-horsepower tractors and construction equipment is being leased to farmers and builders. Deere’s financing business is the owner of about 90% of that leased equipment. Leasing levels are about double the rate in 2012, when the U.S. farm-equipment market was booming because of high crop prices.
Leases allow Deere to bump up sales by delivering machinery to customers who might not be willing to buy in a soft market. But the longer-term risk to the company is that many customers will continue to prefer leasing when the farm economy rebounds, and leasing offers less reliable profit and more complexity than lending customers money with interest to pay for their equipment purchases.
Leases typically last one to four years. The annual payments a farmer makes include the profit on the lease and the finance unit’s expense to acquire the equipment from Deere dealers. When leases expire, the financial-services segment faces the challenge of getting rid of the equipment for an amount determined at the start of the lease. When previously leased farm equipment lands back on dealers’ lots, it contributes to a glut of used equipment already on the market and weighs on equipment prices.
Deere has reported losses recently an the sale of equipment that had been previously leased because the company resorted to cutting prices below estimated values to reduce inventories. Income from its financial-services business is down 34% through the first three quarters of its current fiscal year, though much of the decrease stemmed from a tax adjustment.
“We did incur some losses when we remarketed those machines,” said Joshua Jepsen, Deere’s director of investor relations. Jepsen said Deere’s inventory of returned equipment from leasing is about flat from a year ago and accounts for about 5% of the overall market for used Deere farm equipment.
Deere has shaved its profit outlook in each of the past two quarters as equipment sales growth has weakened, extending a five-year slump in the U.S. machinery market. As veteran executive John May prepares to take over next month as chief executive from Samuel Allen, Deere dealers and analysts expect the equipment maker to focus on reviving sales and profit in the U.S., where the company dominates the market for large farm equipment.
Deere’s stock price has climbed nearly 12% this year, below the 16% increase in the broader-market S&P 500 index.
Bobby Meils used to buy a new Deere harvesting combine each year for his 5,000-acre farm near Peoria, Illinois. When used-equipment prices dropped a few years ago along with farm incomes, his dealer started asking for more cash upfront to offset the shrinking value of the combine he was exchanging. Three years ago, Meils leased a combine instead, and he has since added a leased tractor and cultivators.
He’s paying $60,000 a year to lease the combine and $40,000 a year to lease the $400,000 tractor. To purchase that tractor without a trade-in, he would have had to come up with a 20% down payment – about $80,000 – and take a five-year loan with about a 4% interest rate. He still owns some equipment but isn’t interested in buying more.
“It was costing a lot of money to trade in,” Meils said. “It makes more sense to lease.”
Deere rival CNH Industrial NV, maker of Case IH and New Holland farm equipment, also is relying more on leasing to support sales. More than 40% of the high-horsepower tractors CNH has sold annually in the U.S. since 2014 have been leased, up from 25% in 2012, according to the Uniform Commercial Code data on financed purchases, which cover most of the farm equipment sold in the U.S.
Greg Muckler, who farms 3,000 acres and manages a herd of 200 cows in Grinnell, Iowa, said he leased a CNH-built tractor last month for the first time.
“When it gets worn out, I’m going to turn it back in and lease another one,” he said.
Farmers who lease say the cost of buying their equipment after leases expire is often more than they could pay for similar used machines. Deere has been raising lease rates to lower the purchase price at the end of the leases. But much of the returned equipment is still relegated to the used market where Deere has had to cut prices to move it.
Deere dealers say the company’s financing business has become more careful about how it sheds leased equipment to avoid swamping the used market or auction houses. But dealers say they have grown more cautious about purchasing used equipment from Deere, particularly large four-wheel-drive tractors, without having a buyer because their own inventories of used equipment are swelling.
“For what Deere wants to sell them for, we just can’t take them,” said Ben Rogers, CEO of Martin Sullivan Inc., a Deere dealer for western Illinois.
Bryant Robeson, used-equipment manager for Quality Equipment LLC, a Deere dealer in North Carolina, said used machinery priced at more than $100,000 has been difficult to sell while farmers have snapped up cheaper models.
“You have to be at the right price point,” he said.

Register Now To Attend Oct. 25 OSU Beef Industry Conference And Companion Field Day

By Donald Stotts

Stillwater, Oklahoma – Key updates relative to beef production practices and market outlooks will be featured at the Oct. 25 Oklahoma State University Beef Industry Conference.
“The annual conference has been a convenient way for state and regional beef producers to hear cutting-edge information from and interact with leading experts from across the country, all in a single setting,” said Paul Beck, holder of the OSU Dennis and Marta White Endowed Chair in Animal Science for the university’s Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources.
Cost is $100 per participant. Registration information is available online through the OSU Beef Extension website at http://beefextension.com/files/beef-industry-conference.
The conference will take place at the OSU Conoco-Phillips Alumni Center, located at the corner of University Avenue and Hester Street on the southeastern corner of OSU’s Stillwater campus, near historic Old Central. On-site registration will begin at 8 a.m., with refreshments being offered. Sessions will begin with an official welcome by Beck at 9 a.m.
Tryon Wickersham of Texas A&M University’s department of animal science will lead the first session of the day, entitled “Beef’s job title.” His research focuses on improving the economic and environmental sustainability of beef cattle production.
Terry Mader of Mader Consulting LLC then will provide research-based insights about water intake in cattle. A University of Nebraska professor emeritus of animal science, Mader is currently engaged in national and international projects studying and mitigating environmental effects on animal productivity.
The final morning session will focus on harnessing the value of byproduct feeds in beef cattle production. Ronnie Castlebury of Livestock Nutrition Center LLC will lead the session. He earned his master’s and doctoral degrees in ruminant and beef cattle nutrition from Texas Tech University in 1989 and 1993, respectively.
Following the conference luncheon, Dr. Rosslyn Biggs, OSU Cooperative Extension beef cattle veterinarian, will kick off the afternoon sessions by leading participants through the process of animal disease traceability and identification.
Stan Bevers, owner and operator of the ranch management company Ranch KPI LLC, will lead the final afternoon session focused on making sense of the current cattle and beef markets. A longtime Texas A&M agricultural economist, Bevers specializes in using key performance indicators to evaluate ranch management information systems for the purpose of ranch accounting and analysis, including identifying ranch efficiencies.
“We will also be hosting a companion Beef Cattle Research Field Day on Oct. 24,” Beck said. “There is no cost for conference participants to attend the field day, which will include interactive discussions about different beef cattle research projects at OSU and how they benefit Oklahoma and regional producers.”
The Oct. 24 field day will take place at the OSU Range Cow Research Center, South Range, located at 13810 W. 6th Ave. in Stillwater. Field day sessions will begin at 5 p.m. Dinner will be served at 6:30 p.m. and musical entertainment around the campfire will begin at 7 p.m.
“It should be a fun and interesting evening,” Beck said. “We recommend beef producers register for both the conference and field day. Think of it as one-stop shopping, where you get most everything you need in one go.”
The OSU Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources administers the college of the same name and the university’s two state agencies: The Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service and the Oklahoma Agricultural Experiment Station system.

PRCA And The Cowboy Channel Agree To Landmark TV Deal

Colorado Springs, Colo. – The Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA) and Rural Media Group (RMG) announced a multi-year agreement which will see the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo (NFR) move to The Cowboy Channel (TCC) and RFD-TV beginning in 2020. The ultimate annual rodeo event will now be seen by millions of people live simultaneously on two national TV networks. Also included in the deal is a wide variety of other PRCA programming, including expanded live coverage of the PRORODEO TOUR and the PRCA’s Xtreme Bulls Tour events which will result in a huge increase in the amount, availability and quality of PRCA PRORODEO coverage on The Cowboy Channel, including:
• All 10 nights of the NFR live, and a new East Coast Prime Time encore airing the next day
• Live coverage of at least 18 PRORODEO TOUR final performances each year plus a taped highlight show for encore airings on both The Cowboy Channel and RFD-TV
• TV coverage of 10 episodes of PRCA’s Xtreme Bulls, including the Xtreme Bulls Tour Finale with encore airings on both TCC and RFD-TV.
• Extended pre- and post-coverage of the NFR each night (RODEO LAS VEGAS)
• A new weekly pro rodeo studio show, PRORODEO Tonight
• Heightened event production across all events, including the use of Sky Cam
• Enhanced fan experiences through programming that highlights the uniqueness of local rodeo communities, their organizing committees, and the charities they support, plus special access to the PRCA athletes and other PRCA members whose contributions are key to the sport of PRORODEO
• New national coverage of PRCA PRORODEO on one of the major broadcast networks will be announced at a later date
“This is a huge milestone in the growth of the PRCA,” PRCA CEO, George Taylor said. “Never before has PRORODEO assumed the prime placement and coverage that will be seen under this deal. Our hats are off to Patrick Gottsch and his family, the owners of Rural Media Group, for their enthusiastic interest, support and devotion to our sport.”
The deal will begin early in 2020 and will be preceded with the launch of the weekly PRORODEO Tonight show on The Cowboy Channel. The PRCA regular-season coverage on The Cowboy Channel and RFD-TV is planned to begin in January. The finals of each televised PRORODEO TOUR event will be shown live on The Cowboy Channel and will be seen in taped highlight form later in the week in prime time and weekend afternoons on RFD-TV. Regular-season coverage also will include 10 episodes of the PRCA’s Xtreme Bulls series, each with multiple runs across dayparts. The coverage will be a co-production of PRCA and RMG.
NFR programming for 2020 will start with a 24-hour marathon of prior NFR finals, leading up to a red-carpet pre-event show, and the live NFR simulcast on both RFD-TV and The Cowboy Channel for 10 straight nights. Each episode of NFR coverage will conclude with a one-hour post-event show. Replays of each episode of the NFR will take place the next day on both networks, including in East Coast and West Coast Prime Time.
“Our new state-of-the-art studio in the Fort Worth Stockyards will serve as the base for producing the daily PRCA programming, leading up to and culminating each year with the National Finals Rodeo,” added The Cowboy Channel CEO Raquel Gottsch. “The massive volume of programming expected to be generated from this 6-year agreement will serve to populate both The Cowboy Channel and RFD-TV with original, unduplicated ‘live’ sports-related content which is very much desired by all cable, satellite, and distribution companies. We expect our distribution to grow substantially as a result.”

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 48,100

Texas 19,400. 95 over 600 lbs. 35 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 600-650 lbs 145.00; 650-700 lbs 142.05-149.88; 700-750 lbs 142.10-150.20; 750-800 lbs 144.00-148.85; 800-850 lbs 142.50-144.85; 850-900 lbs 138.00; Current Del 650-700 lbs 145.00-150.00; 700-750 lbs 146.35; 800-850 lbs 142.00; 850-900 lbs 137.75-140.00; Nov FOB 800-850 lbs 138.35; Dec FOB 650-700 lbs 140.50; Oct-Nov Del 700-750 lbs 147.00; Nov Del 650-700 lbs 150.35; 700-750 lbs 143.00-148.35; 750-800 lbs 144.00; 800-850 lbs 140.00; Dec Del 750-800 lbs 136.75-139.50; 800-850 lbs 136.00; Jan Del 750800 lbs 128.00; 800-850 lbs 134.00. Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB 550600 lbs 149.20; 650-700 lbs 145.82-146.01; 700-750 lbs 136.77-144.62; 750-800 lbs 143.29-144.56; 800-850 lbs 135.89; 850-900 lbs 135.38; Current Del 400-450 lbs 157.00; 650-700 lbs 148.50-152.50; 700-750 lbs 146.00-149.00; 750-800 lbs 141.00-145.00; 800-850 lbs 140.00-142.00; Oct-Nov FOB 750-800 lbs 147.58; Nov FOB 750-800 lbs 138.56; 800-850 lbs 135.94; Oct-Nov Del 650-700 lbs 142.50; 750-800 lbs 140.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 550-600 lbs 144.00; 600-650 lbs 142.00; 650-700 lbs 140.88; Current Del 600-650 lbs 143.00; 650-700 lbs 135.00-142.00; Nov FOB 600-650 lbs 143.60; 650-700 lbs 138.00; 700-750 lbs 138.25; 750-800 lbs 130.00-134.85; Dec FOB 650-700 lbs 133.00; Nov Del 600-650 lbs 139.85; Dec Del 650-700 lbs 132.25; 700-750 lbs 128.40-130.72; Jan Del 700-750 lbs 126.85; 750-800 lbs 129.65; Feb Del 700-750 lbs 122.00. Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB 600-650 lbs 136.72-144.20; 650-700 lbs 136.20-136.29; 700-750 lbs 131.89-136.22; Current Del 450-500 lbs 147.00; 650-700 lbs 141.00; 750-800 lbs 137.00; Oct-Nov FOB 700-750 lbs 139.58; Nov FOB 700-750 lbs 133.54; Oct-Nov Del 650-700 lbs 137.00.

Oklahoma 4000. 100 over 600 lbs. 46 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 700-750 lbs 150.79; 800-850 lbs 143.83; Current Del 650-700 lbs 151.00; 700-750 lbs 149.00; Nov FOB 650-700 lbs 147.35; 700-750 lbs 145.35; 800-850 lbs 139.50. Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB 650-700 lbs 147.00; 750-800 lbs 137.83; Current FOB 850-900 lbs 143.56; Current Del 650-700 lbs 150.00; 700-750 lbs 146.00; 750-800 lbs 145.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 650-700 lbs 139.00; Current Del 650-700 lbs 142.00. Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB 650-700 lbs 136.45; 700-750 lbs 133.56; 750-800 lbs 126.65; Dec FOB 700-750 lbs 125.40-127.72.

New Mexico 400. 100 over 600 lbs. 10 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 650-700 lbs 144.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 650-700 lbs 134.00.

Kansas 5100. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 22 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 700-750 lbs 151.12; 800-850 lbs 144.80; Current Del 700-750 lbs 153.00; 750-800 lbs 147.00-151.00; 800-850 lbs 145.00; 850-900 lbs 145.50; Nov Del 800-850 lbs 143.50. Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB 750-800 lbs 141.13; Nov FOB 650-700 lbs 141.15; Current Del 800-850 lbs 146.00; Nov Del 750-800 lbs 143.00; Jan Del 800-850 lbs 139.85. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Nov Del 750-800 lbs 138.00-139.00. Medium and Large 1-2 Current Del 700-750 lbs 135.00; Jan Del 750-800 lbs 135.85.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — October 11
National feeder cattle receipts: 218,500

Steers and heifers sold uneven; $3 lower to $2 higher. There were some instances in the Northern Plains of steer and heifer calves selling up to $8 lower than the previous week. Good demand remains for yearlings as the supply becomes more limited and the cash fed cattle market has come off lows received in the aftermath of the plant fire in August. Demand for calves has been light to moderate at best, with sharp discounts being applied to unweaned calves with no solid health programs. The Southeast complex has started to move more calves compared to recent weeks and the demand would be considered moderate to good. Demand for feeders is good for those calves at least 45 days weaned and preferably 60 days along with a couple of rounds of shots. The seasonal temperature swings have arrived and calves that show up bawling and without health records have a hard time finding eager new owners, regardless of genetics they may possess. Farmer feeders have just begun their corn harvest in some areas, however most of the corn is not down to that 15 percent moisture that everyone is looking for. Many of the farmer feeders don’t have much interest in buying calves until they have their grain harvest complete as they don’t have the time necessary to check and doctor bawling calves. Persistent rains have yard conditions wet and muddy which is also causing cattle feeders to wait on buying calves. More moisture across the mid-section of the country coupled with the early winter storm brought snow which caused consignments of calves to cancel and auctions to reschedule in the Dakotas. Much larger auction receipts expected Oct. 18 in the Northern Plains. In the Southern Plains, wheat planting is basically completed by now and temperatures are moving to a typical fall situation. An early freeze will probably be seen in Oklahoma and to parts of Texas, leaving the grazing Bermuda brown in color until it warms up again next spring. In Nebraska, most sellers pick a week and sell their livestock about the same time every year and the bulk of the calves and some yearlings are a few pounds lighter than last year. Most pasture grass grew rapidly all summer and never harden up like most years. A lot of producers complained about the “washy” grass and it has affected the weaning weight on a lot of calves. To add more insult to injury 500 to 600 lbs steers calves averaged $16-24 per cwt less Oct. 11 than same week last year. A sharp in the Feeder Cattle futures on Oct. 9 left the front 4 months gaining at least $2 in value. For the week, the Choice cutout closed $3.70 higher at $215.66, while Select was $1.76 higher at $188.68; putting the Choice-Select spread at $26.98. On Oct. 10, the Choice-Select spread was at $28.97, the largest since mid-June 2017. Packers continue to chase the quality as longer fed cattle in Northern Plains commanded a higher price than the Southern Plains Oct. 4. Cattle Slaughter under federal inspection estimated at 640K for the week, 6K more than Oct. 4 and 2K less than a year ago.

Texas 4500. 63 pct over 600 lbs. 35 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (427) 166.27; 450-500 lbs (468) 159.09; 500-550 lbs (520) 156.33; 550-600 lbs (573) 142.71; 600-650 lbs (627) 140.59; 650-700 lbs (674) 145.05; 700-750 lbs (727) 145.12; 750-800 lbs (765) 145.78; 800-850 lbs (831) 140.91; 850-900 lbs (873) 139.54; 900-950 lbs (925) 125.33. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (422) 150.02; 450-500 lbs (483) 144.85; 550-600 lbs (579) 135.67; 600-650 lbs (625) 135.00; 700-750 lbs (717) 132.39; 750-800 lbs (756) 138.47. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 450-500 lbs (477) 140.05; 500-550 lbs (524) 137.03; 600-650 lbs (626) 132.28; 650-700 lbs (672) 134.04; pkg 757 lbs 125.00. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (414) 130.53; 450-500 lbs (470) 133.53; 500-550 lbs (516) 127.60; 550-600 lbs (577) 125.26; 600-650 lbs (625) 120.97.

Oklahoma 31,300. 61 pct over 600 lbs. 39 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (326) 174.00; 350-400 lbs (381) 172.35; 400-450 lbs (432) 167.93; 450-500 lbs (476) 164.36; 500-550 lbs (528) 153.94; 550-600 lbs (576) 146.50; 600-650 lbs (624) 147.56; 650-700 lbs (672) 146.93; 700-750 lbs (721) 147.91; 750-800 lbs (776) 148.37; 800-850 lbs (816) 144.07; 850-900 lbs (873) 138.43; 900-950 lbs (920) 133.64; 950-1000 lbs (959) 131.69; 1000-1050 lbs (1017) 128.10; few loads 1063 lbs 127.00. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (334) 160.31; 350-400 lbs (378) 154.52; 400-450 lbs (434) 153.12; 450-500 lbs (481) 149.25; 500-550 lbs (522) 136.37; 550-600 lbs (570) 140.33; 600-650 lbs (627) 141.02; 650-700 lbs (675) 138.66; 700-750 lbs (725) 134.31; 750-800 lbs (770) 138.67; 800-850 lbs (847) 139.00; 850-900 lbs (882) 135.50; 900-950 lbs (926) 126.97; 950-1000 lbs (970) 123.84. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (333) 137.58; 350-400 lbs (375) 139.06; 400-450 lbs (424) 137.75; 450-500 lbs (470) 132.58; 500-550 lbs (527) 132.38; 550-600 lbs (579) 134.73; 600-650 lbs (629) 139.04; 650-700 lbs (674) 138.68; 700-750 lbs (727) 136.55; 750-800 lbs (767) 133.76; 800-850 lbs (819) 132.06; 850-900 lbs (866) 128.44; 900-950 lbs (904) 121.35. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (322) 130.95; 350-400 lbs (371) 131.15; 400-450 lbs (424) 127.52; 450-500 lbs (475) 126.44; 500-550 lbs (523) 125.15; 550-600 lbs (576) 125.76; 600-650 lbs (621) 130.50; 650-700 lbs (675) 132.03; 700-750 lbs (723) 129.36; 750-800 lbs (767) 122.44; 800-850 lbs (831) 125.35; 850-900 lbs (863) 116.95.

New Mexico 3200. 26 pct over 600 lbs. 39 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (385) 164.11; 400-450 lbs (430) 163.53; 450-500 lbs (476) 152.06; 500-550 lbs (521) 149.15; 550-600 lbs (576) 140.47; 600-650 lbs (634) 130.77; 650-700 lbs (670) 129.63; 700-750 lbs (730) 127.60; 750-800 lbs (776) 133.55; 800-850 lbs (822) 128.04. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (375) 160.13; 400-450 lbs (426) 156.97; 450-500 lbs (470) 149.25; 500-550 lbs (524) 143.24; 550-600 lbs (573) 138.70; 600-650 lbs (618) 136.23; 800-850 lbs (834) 134.17. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (333) 148.69; 350-400 lbs (382) 137.38; 400-450 lbs (421) 139.61; 450-500 lbs (482) 132.17; 500-550 lbs (531) 127.90; 550-600 lbs (569) 126.21; 600-650 lbs (616) 125.84; 650-700 lbs (663) 122.37; 700-750 lbs (729) 124.93. Medium and Large 12 350-400 lbs (376) 136.56; 400-450 lbs (429) 135.33; 450-500 lbs (472) 126.34; 500-550 lbs (518) 124.17; 550-600 lbs (569) 123.27; 700-750 lbs (726) 119.83.

Kansas 7200. 82 pct over 600 lbs. 41 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 500-550 lbs (506) 161.73; 550-600 lbs (573) 156.57; 600-650 lbs (639) 153.01; 800-850 lbs (811) 145.37; 900-950 lbs (933) 137.53; 950-1000 lbs (973) 135.19; pkg 1051 lbs 130.00. Medium and Large 1-2 500-550 lbs (517) 147.24; 550-600 lbs (579) 144.89; 650-700 lbs (675) 141.52; 800-850 lbs (826) 136.40. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (372) 176.89; 400-450 lbs (428) 160.52; 500-550 lbs (515) 143.80; 550-600 lbs (567) 143.19; 600-650 lbs (630) 140.19; 650-700 lbs (674) 141.61; 700-750 lbs (714) 141.16; 750-800 lbs (781) 134.24; 800-850 lbs (820) 134.16. Medium and Large 1-2 550-600 lbs (572) 135.37; 650-700 lbs (674) 135.87; load 930 lbs 122.00; pkg 963 lbs 118.31.

Missouri 22,100. 48 pct over 600 lbs. 40 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (330) 173.78; 350-400 lbs (375) 168.29; 400-450 lbs (426) 167.90; 450-500 lbs (471) 162.28; 500-550 lbs (524) 156.38; 550-600 lbs (576) 152.56; 600-650 lbs (627) 152.12; 650-700 lbs (679) 148.80; 700-750 lbs (724) 148.43; 750-800 lbs (774) 145.84; 800-850 lbs (833) 143.66; 850-900 lbs (875) 139.19; 900-950 lbs (925) 136.81; 950-1000 lbs (955) 129.15. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (384) 161.97; 400-450 lbs (425) 155.15; 450-500 lbs (481) 150.29; 500-550 lbs (525) 147.68; 550-600 lbs (571) 145.14; 600-650 lbs (629) 142.81; 650-700 lbs (664) 140.50; 700-750 lbs (733) 142.40; 750-800 lbs (767) 138.66; 800-850 lbs (817) 132.58. Dairy Steers: Large 3 pkg 195 lbs 80.00; 700-750 lbs (715) 80.87. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (330) 143.23; 350-400 lbs (384) 142.24; 400-450 lbs (428) 144.64; 450-500 lbs (477) 140.01; 500-550 lbs (526) 137.21; 550-600 lbs (576) 138.75; 600-650 lbs (625) 139.44; 650-700 lbs (673) 136.79; 700-750 lbs (726) 138.63; 750-800 lbs (782) 131.33; 800-850 lbs (832) 132.54; 850-900 lbs (867) 119.99. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (376) 134.18; 400-450 lbs (425) 133.83; 450-500 lbs (469) 131.57; 500-550 lbs (523) 131.87; 550-600 lbs (572) 130.24; 600-650 lbs (624) 135.01; 650-700 lbs (666) 133.35; 700-750 lbs (724) 130.89; 750-800 lbs (764) 126.17; 800-850 lbs (817) 130.01.

Arkansas 8400. 23 pct over 600 lbs. 41 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (322) 155.14; 350-400 lbs (375) 163.80; 400-450 lbs (423) 153.76; 450-500 lbs (472) 149.91; 500-550 lbs (523) 141.69; 550-600 lbs (568) 136.51; 600-650 lbs (628) 136.34; 650-700 lbs (674) 138.84; 700-750 lbs (723) 130.03. Medium and Large 1-2 500-550 lbs (514) 144.98; 550-600 lbs (575) 134.28; 650-700 lbs (660) 138.04; 800-850 lbs (817) 134.05; pkg 956 lbs 128.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (324) 138.46; 350-400 lbs (378) 137.36; 400-450 lbs (422) 131.25; 450-500 lbs (477) 128.69; 500-550 lbs (522) 123.64; 550-600 lbs (569) 123.81; 600-650 lbs (624) 121.42; 650-700 lbs (669) 114.14; 700-750 lbs (719) 114.65. Medium and Large 12 250-300 lbs (297) 129.23; 500-550 lbs (517) 120.46; 550-600 lbs (568) 125.19.

 

 

 

 

 

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Friday, October 18, 2019 1:24 PM