China Responds Against Soybeans, Pork After U.S. Slaps Tariffs On Chinese Technology

By Chris Clayton
DTN Staff Reporter

Omaha (DTN) – Leaders from the American Soybean Association could only respond in dismay after President Donald Trump announced he was going ahead with $34 billion in tariffs against Chinese technology products because China wasted little time imposing a 25% tariff on U.S. soybeans and other agricultural products.
The Trump administration announced June 15 that it would place a 25% tariff on goods that contain “industrially significant technologies.” These include products under China’s “Made in China 2025” strategy. The U.S. can no longer tolerate losing technology and intellectual property to unfair economic practices, the White House stated. The administration also said it was preparing tariff lines on another $16 billion in Chinese goods that would be announced later this summer.
“These tariffs are essential to preventing further unfair transfers of American technology and intellectual property to China, which will protect American jobs,” the White House stated. “In addition, they will serve as an initial step toward bringing balance to the trade relationship between the United States and China.”
CHINA’S TARIFFS TO BE IMPOSED
Directing almost equal countermeasures, China’s Ministry of Commerce officials announced early June 16 in China that the country would impose 25% tariffs on $34 billion in U.S. products on July 6 on a range of products, including soybeans, but also products such as pork and chicken, as well as a list of non-agricultural products. Soybeans alone account for about roughly $14 billion in export value to China.
In the same vein as the U.S., China also stated it was preparing another round of 25% tariffs on $16 billion in U.S. products that would include chemicals, medical equipment and energy products.
The White House had stated that the U.S. would pursue additional tariffs if China retaliates, “such as imposing new tariffs on United States goods, services, or agricultural products; raising non-tariff barriers; or taking punitive actions against American exporters or American companies operating in China.”
Even before China made its official announcement, commodity futures fell sharply for grains and oilseeds, though corn and wheat contracts rallied to reflect more modest daily losses. Soybeans, one of the largest U.S. export products to China, saw an early 21 3/4-cent drop in the July contract to $9.05 on the CME. The November contract fell 19 1/2 cents to $9.30. DTN’s National Soybean Index closed at $8.64 June 14, priced 63 cents below the July contract and at its lowest price in 10 months.
Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue held a press call largely to talk about his trip to Canada, but he also got multiple questions about how USDA would respond to the Chinese tariffs and whether he was ready to tap into as much as $15 billion in Commodity Credit Corp. funds to help farmers. Perdue said it was important to see how the price situation plays out for farmers rather than looking at daily market fluctuations.
SEE HOW MARKET PRICES PLAY OUT
“You can’t demonstrate any damage on the day that tariffs are announced,” Perdue said. “We’re going to look at this very carefully. We’re going to calculate – we have been calculating market impact on a weekly basis on a number of months now, frankly ... When we determine and if we determine there is legitimate and lasting market impact, based on market disruption of tariffs and retaliation, then we’re prepared to take action.”
The American Soybean Association used words such as “distraught” and “devastating” to express the group’s frustration, after the group twice sought meetings with Trump to highlight ways that boosting soybean exports to China could be part of a trade solution rather than resorting to tariffs. Instead, the group noted a “new anxiety” for soybean growers.
“As a soy grower, I depend on trade with China,” said Davie Stephens, vice president of ASA and a Kentucky farmer. “China imports roughly 60% of total U.S. soybean exports, representing nearly one in three rows of harvested soybeans. This is a vital and robust market that soy growers have spent over 40 years building and, frankly, it’s not a market U.S. soybean farmers can afford to lose.”
ALARM SOUNDED
Tom Donohue, president and CEO of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, criticized the White House action in a statement, saying the Chamber has sought to sound the alarm against such actions.
“Imposing tariffs places the cost of China’s unfair trade practices squarely on the shoulders of American consumers, manufacturers, farmers, and ranchers,” Donohue said. “This is not the right approach.”
The U.S. tariffs were added to more than 1,300 tariff lines of products made in China, most of which will go into effect on July 6. The main tariff line of products, valued at roughly $34 billion, involved industries such as aerospace, information technology, robotics, industrial machinery, new materials and automobiles. Another set of products, valued at $16 billion, will undergo review and public comments before tariffs would be issued on those as well.
The Association of Equipment Manufacturers said the tariffs jeopardized the industry because China constructs different types of construction and agricultural equipment. The tariffs affect U.S. companies importing equipment that is added to U.S. machinery.
“Given depressed U.S. farm incomes, the move is expected to disproportionately hurt America’s rural economy,” the group stated.
TAX ON LIVELIHOODS
Brian Kuehl, executive director of Farmers for Free Trade, a group set up to tout NAFTA and avoid trade disruption, said the White House move is “downright scary. It’s no longer a negotiating tactic, it’s a tax on their livelihoods. Within days, soybean, corn, wheat and other American farmers are likely to be hit with retaliatory tariffs of up to 25% on exports that keep their operations afloat. When they do, they’re not going to remain silent.”
Kuehl added that the tariffs are not only a loss for U.S. farmers, but a win for U.S. export competitors. “When American soybeans and corn become more expensive, South America wins. When beef becomes more expensive, Australia wins,” Kuehl said. “As this trade war drags on, farmers will rightly question why our competitors are winning while we’re losing.”
Ohio State University released a report stating farmers in that state “could lose more than half of his or her annual net income” due to Chinese tariffs.

Tom Frey Elected LMA President For 2018-2020 Term

Kansas City, Mo. – Tom Frey, Creston Livestock Auction in Creston, Iowa, was elected president of the Livestock Marketing Association (LMA). In this role, Frey will complete a two-year term leading the nation’s largest livestock marketing trade association that represents more than 800 local livestock auction markets and allied businesses.
Originally from Nebraska, Frey’s first involvement in the livestock marketing industry was working for the Vanberg family at Columbus Sales Pavilion, Inc., in Columbus, Neb. Following, he attained additional experience working at Centennial Livestock Auction in Centennial, Colo., until he and wife, Leisa, purchased Creston Livestock Auction in 1999. Frey started his path to presidency in 2006 by serving on the LMA Membership Services Committee and has remained involved in the organization since then.
Frey credits his success in the business to lessons learned while working at other livestock auctions, including the advice that “you will get everything in life that you want if you help enough other people get what they want.”
At the 2018 LMA Annual Convention, Frey challenged current LMA members to become more involved in the organization, citing the opportunity to make a difference in the industry. The incoming president commented that markets in each state are unique, and the perspective from various member-market owners across the United States is valuable to Association work.
Additionally, the new president commented on issues at hand, noting that the Association has made strides in progress, with work ahead. Of those issues, Frey elaborated specifically on the Dealer Statutory Trust, transportation (regarding electronic logging devices and hours of service), and animal disease traceability.
“As the government interest and talk on these issues continues to heat up, LMA needs to be there (at the table) and will be there, working on the members’ behalf,” Frey said.

House Farm Bill Language Would Help Promote Farmer Group Health Plans

By Chris Clayton
DTN Ag Policy Editor

Omaha (DTN) – The farm bill could be used next year to offer some relief for farmers from high healthcare insurance premiums they face.
Association Health Plans (AHPs) have become an avenue touted by the Trump administration to reduce health insurance costs for small employers. The U.S. Department of Labor has a proposal, which could become final any day, to expand the use of AHPs. The plans could provide a potentially cheaper insurance option for millions of people, including 6 million small-business employees and 3 million sole proprietors.
Under the proposed rule, AHPs would be allowed for businesses with a “commonality of interests,” such a farmers. The Labor Department is dropping requirements that businesses must have at least one employee, which would broaden AHPs to sole proprietors. And the association doesn’t have to exist solely to market health coverage, so farm groups and others can create plans.
Boosting the Department of Labor plan, the House version of the farm bill has language allowing USDA to provide up to $65 million in grants to farm trade associations for support and technical assistance to create agricultural association health plans. The bill also allows up to $15 million annually in loans to establish health plans. The Senate farm bill, however, does not have comparable language included in its version.
Karen Pollitz, a senior fellow and expert on health reform at the Kaiser Family Foundation, has been watching the Department of Labor proposal on AHPs and told DTN expectations are that a final rule will come out “any day now.” The labor secretary has also said the rule will come out sometime in June.
The AHPs basically allow small employers to pool together for health policies, though it’s likely the rules coming out under the Department of Labor will not have all of the requirements demanded of health insurance policies under the Affordable Care Act. The Labor Department calls AHPs “an innovate option for expanding access to employer-sponsored coverage (especially for small businesses).”
SOME CRITICS
The plans have critics, though, because they might not provide the same kind of coverage as other insurance policies.
AHPs would largely look attractive to people who make too much income to qualify for subsidized insurance on the Affordable Care Act marketplace. About 40% of people buying insurance on the open market don’t qualify for those Obamacare subsidies, and that’s where a lot of farmers paying high premiums fall.
“There are certainly people who need relief, people who don’t qualify for a subsidy under the ACA,” Pollitz said. “The question is how to provide that.”
A USDA-funded study of farmers released last summer found nearly three-quarters of farmers consider health insurance an important or very important risk-management strategy on their operations. But just over half of all farmers and ranchers are not confident they could cover the costs of a major illness or injury. Farmers are vulnerable to high premiums, partially because of age, and nearly two-thirds of those surveyed reported a pre-existing condition. For more on the study’s findings, visit http://docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/85136a_2cc79e77a6ab471688a5b76bf9ec1c04.pdf
Under the proposed rule, associations would not be required to provide the essential health benefits. There could be an option for self-employed people to buy a plan without prescription drug benefits, for instance. There also would be no restrictions on rating people based on age, gender or where they live. Still, the lower rates could entice younger people to buy a policy.

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 56,400

Texas 29,700. 77 pct over 600 lbs. 40 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 675-685 lbs 147.65; 745 lbs 148.50; 750 lbs 144.86; 800-825 lbs 139.60; 850-860 lbs 132.12; July 665 lbs 158.96; 775 lbs 142.75; 800 lbs 137.75; Aug 700-725 lbs 149.34; 750-775 lbs 144.74; 800 lbs 139.75; Sept 550 lbs 162.40; 650 lbs 156.00; 750-775 lbs 146.61; Oct 800 lbs 144.75; Del Current 525 lbs 170.00; 550 lbs 171.83; 675 lbs 152.50; 750 lbs 146.50; 875-885 lbs 130.97; July 750 lbs 148.00; Aug 650 lbs 156.00; Sept 725 lbs 147.30; 835 lbs 142.75; Oct 775 lbs 147.50; 800 lbs 144.43. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 575 lbs 158.81; 625 lbs 148.77; 650-680 lbs 152.80; 700-740 lbs 142.12; 750-785 lbs 139.19; 800-825 lbs 134.72; 850-885 lbs 129.52; Aug 650 lbs 151.60 Mex; Sept 550 lbs 160.50 Mex; Del Current 450-475 lbs 175.50 Mex; 550 lbs 156.25 Mex; 600-625 lbs 160.41; 700 lbs 150.00; 800-825 lbs 137.27; 940 lbs 126.00; 990 lbs 124.00; July 450 lbs 177.00 Mex; 550 lbs 159.00 Mex; 625 lbs 163.50, 146.50 Mex. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 550 lbs 151.50; 600-620 lbs 142.70; 650-675 lbs 137.00; 725 lbs 139.44; 825 lbs 124.00; July 615 lbs 151.96; 700-725 lbs 137.64; 750 lbs 137.00; Aug 700-725 lbs 136.94; Sept 500 lbs 155.40; 675 lbs 140.75; 700-725 lbs 138.97; Del Current 500 lbs 155.00; 550 lbs 155.00; 625 lbs 144.00; 650-670 lbs 142.74; July 485 lbs 160.00; 725 lbs 140.56; 750 lbs 135.64; Aug 725 lbs 135.95; 750 lbs 137.60; Sept 675 lbs 142.00; 700-735 lbs 139.71; Oct 725 lbs 139.75. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 575 lbs 146.95; 620-625 lbs 137.80; 710-740 lbs 126.86; 770-790 lbs 125.83; 800 lbs 127.88; Del 450 lbs 155.00 Mex; 525 lbs 145.50 Mex; 600 lbs 152.00, 625 lbs 134.50 Mex; 700-710 lbs 135.25; 800 lbs 123.00.

Oklahoma 3200. 82 pct over 600 lbs. 42 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 550 lbs 169.83; 650 lbs 159.06; 700-735 lbs 145.23; 750-785 lbs 142.82; 800-825 lbs 136.52; 875 lbs 130.32; Oct 800 lbs 141.75. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 480 lbs 170.57; Aug 650 lbs 153.00; Del Current 785 lbs 139.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 500 lbs 152.50; 600-625 lbs 142.91; 660 lbs 139.06; 700 lbs 131.94; 750 lbs 130.58; July 725 lbs 138.50; Aug 725 lbs 134.80; Sept 700 lbs 138.11.

New Mexico 2700. 37 pct over 600 lbs. 14 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1-2 Current 450-460 lbs 170.96 Mex; 775 lbs 137.25; 800 lbs 135.28; July 450 lbs 173.00 Mex; 550 lbs 155.00 Mex; 625 lbs 142.50 Mex; July 750 lbs 136.10; Aug 750 lbs 137.00.

Kansas 4200. 94 pct over 600 lbs. 35 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB July 750 lbs 146.00; Del Current 650 lbs 162.00; 700 lbs 150.00; 750-785 lbs 141.80; 800-825 lbs 139.45; 885 lbs 132.50. Medium and Large 1-2 Del Current 740 lbs 142.27; 875 lbs 131.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Aug 750 lbs 134.00; 675 lbs 140.00; Del Current 575 lbs 151.00; 600-620 lbs 144.59; 660-685 lbs 139.21; 710-730 lbs 133.93; 750-775 lbs 131.31. Medium and Large 1-2 Del Current 575 lbs 150.00.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — June 15
National feeder cattle receipts: 179,900

Steers sold $3 lower to $3 higher, while heifers were steady to $3 higher. Another week away from Memorial Day and the aggressive movement of cattle out of feedlots in recent weeks brought good demand for offerings at auctions. Heat has become a concern in the Central Plains recently as summer-like temperatures have become very evident even though the calendar hasn’t come to the summer solstice yet. After $3-4 losses in the Feeder Cattle contracts from June 11-14, they came out with a bang on June 15 to close the week on a very strong note. For the week, the front month August gained 0.70, while the next 5 deferred months lost 0.15 to 0.80 for the week. June Live Cattle at one time traded nearly limit up today, however backed off just a tick going into mid-day. The August Live Cattle contract did close $2.90 higher for the day to bring about some optimism after also being near $4 lower for the week after June 14 close. The volatility was enough to make your head swivel around and try to figure out what in the world is going on. Moving targets have gotten harder and harder to hit these days as electronic trading can get it done very quickly. May 2018 steer and heifer slaughter is poised to be the largest since 2011 when final numbers are released. According to preliminary numbers, approximately 2.304 million head of steers and heifers were harvested in May 2018, 5.1 percent above a year ago and 13 percent higher than the previous three-year average. The cattle harvest estimated at 654K, 4K lower than June 8 and 15K higher than a year ago. Year to Date cattle slaughter is 3.1 percent above a year ago and with packer margins per head into triple digits, there will have to be convergence of boxed beef prices and fed cattle prices to slow down chain speeds. On June 11 at Tri-State Livestock in McCook, NE two loads of steers weighing 849 lbs sold at $152.50; nearly $1300 per head before freight. Six loads of bigger steers weighing 953 lbs sold at $142.85. On June 12 at Kingsville Livestock Auction in Kingsville, MO a package of 808 lbs steers sold at $150. On June 13 at Huss-Platte Valley Auction in Kearney, NE, three drafts of steers weighing between 702 and 711 lbs sold from $167-169 and post a weighted average of $167.32. Also, on June 13 at the St Joseph Stockyards in St Joseph, MO a half load of 702 lb fancy steers sold at $166. Demand was very good for these packages and strings in spite of lower futures price at their individual point in the week. Demand for boxed beef continues to be strong even though prices have declined since the most recent highs in May. For the week, Choice cutout closed $4.62 lower at $221.59. while the Select cutout closed $0.45 lower at $202.73. The Choice-Select spread now sets at $18.86 to close the week.

Texas 3600. 75 pct over 600 lbs. 51 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 600-650 lbs (630) 152.25; 650-700 lbs (682) 147.39; 700-750 lbs (724) 144.12; 750-800 lbs (779) 141.41; 800-850 lbs (830) 134.33; 850-900 lbs (888) 127.41. Medium and Large 1-2 650-700 lbs (688) 138.92; 850-900 lbs (879) 122.67; 950-1000 lbs (973) 113.31. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 pkg 569 lbs 137.21; 600-650 lbs (624) 140.34; 650-700 lbs (677) 135.01; 700-750 lbs (720) 129.33; few loads 775 lbs 126.00. Medium and Large 1-2 500-550 lbs (527) 129.41; 550-600 lbs (571) 127.26; 700-750 lbs (743) 123.99.

Oklahoma 31,500. 73 pct over 600 lbs. 41 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (319) 196.79; 350-400 lbs (369) 186.07; 400-450 lbs (427) 177.62; 450-500 lbs (473) 178.16; 500-550 lbs (525) 164.38; 550-600 lbs (579) 163.85; 600-650 lbs (625) 157.59; 650-700 lbs (674) 155.74; 700-750 lbs (723) 145.02; 750-800 lbs (778) 143.69; 800-850 lbs (823) 141.27; 850-900 lbs (874) 136.13; 900-950 lbs (924) 130.78; 950-1000 lbs (969) 124.23; 1000-1050 lbs (1027) 120.34; 1050-1100 lbs (1077) 118.79. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (335) 170.59; 350-400 lbs (379) 170.65; 400-450 lbs (424) 166.57; 450-500 lbs (474) 163.84; 500-550 lbs (535) 156.22; 550-600 lbs (576) 151.71; 600-650 lbs (622) 150.02; 650-700 lbs (677) 148.24; 700-750 lbs (728) 143.85; 750-800 lbs (778) 140.09; 800-850 lbs (821) 135.25; 850-900 lbs (871) 130.36; 900-950 lbs (928) 125.92; 950-1000 lbs (975) 118.21; 1000-1050 lbs (1030) 109.59. Holstein Steers: Large 3 part load 550 lbs 88.25. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (328) 163.01; 350-400 lbs (373) 157.16; 400-450 lbs (423) 159.92; 450-500 lbs (474) 151.75; 500-550 lbs (526) 148.94; 550-600 lbs (574) 146.70; 600-650 lbs (619) 145.09; 650-700 lbs (668) 140.97; 700-750 lbs (726) 133.72; 750-800 lbs (769) 129.23; 800-850 lbs (822) 125.74; 850-900 lbs (874) 121.89; 900-950 lbs (919) 114.51; 950-1000 lbs (980) 112.34. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (377) 152.38; 400-450 lbs (428) 149.52; 450-500 lbs (493) 143.74; 500-550 lbs (527) 143.11; 550-600 lbs (573) 141.24; 600-650 lbs (630) 138.67; 650-700 lbs (672) 135.49; 700-750 lbs (729) 131.41; 750-800 lbs (773) 124.76; 800-850 lbs (830) 122.71; 850-900 lbs (873) 118.14.

New Mexico 4700. 51 pct over 600 lbs. 38 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 550-600 lbs (572) 159.63; 600-650 lbs (617) 151.53; 650-700 lbs (667) 151.17; 750-800 lbs (792) 137.41; few loads 861 lbs 133.50. Medium and Large 1-2 450-500 lbs (474) 169.20; 700-750 lbs (718) 142.77. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 450-500 lbs (464) 154.92; 500-550 lbs (509) 144.53; 550-600 lbs (579) 139.75.

Kansas 6600. 95 pct over 600 lbs. 22 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 600-650 lbs (604) 166.63; 650-700 lbs (671) 156.81; 700-750 lbs (727) 153.97; 750-800 lbs (779) 148.89; 800-850 lbs (815) 143.57; 850-900 lbs (869) 140.10; 900-950 lbs (925) 135.72; few loads 953 lbs 132.50. Medium and Large 1-2 500-550 lbs (526) 166.46; 650-700 lbs (679) 149.69; 700-750 lbs (742) 144.42; 750-800 lbs (790) 143.59; 800-850 lbs (834) 136.10; 850-900 lbs (886) 134.84; 900-950 lbs (927) 127.64; 950-1000 lbs (978) 125.42. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 450-500 lbs (495) 160.28; 500-550 lbs (523) 153.20; part load 562 lbs 152.00; 650-700 lbs (664) 147.25; 700-750 lbs (725) 137.67; 750-800 lbs (774) 133.32; 800-850 lbs (820) 127.70; 900-950 lbs (919) 120.82. Medium and Large 1-2 550-600 lbs (586) 142.06; 600-650 lbs (634) 138.78; 650-700 lbs (674) 138.60; part load 742 lbs 134.25; 750-800 lbs (795) 126.63; 800-850 lbs (817) 122.19; 850-900 lbs (865) 122.83.

Missouri 34,100. 48 pct over 600 lbs. 42 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (320) 194.66; 350-400 lbs (377) 185.85; 400-450 lbs (425) 180.99; 450-500 lbs (480) 177.78; 500-550 lbs (528) 173.95; 550-600 lbs (572) 165.96; 600-650 lbs (625) 161.57; 650-700 lbs (669) 155.38; 700-750 lbs (723) 150.01; 750-800 lbs (773) 144.54; 800-850 lbs (819) 139.97; 850-900 lbs (879) 134.84; 900-950 lbs (918) 133.07; 950-1000 lbs (975) 130.30; 1000-1050 lbs (1011) 115.98. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (386) 174.01; 400-450 lbs (423) 167.37; 450-500 lbs (475) 167.11; 500-550 lbs (526) 163.77; 550-600 lbs (572) 159.17; 600-650 lbs (629) 152.72; 650-700 lbs (671) 148.68; 700-750 lbs (720) 141.09; 750-800 lbs (774) 139.64; 800-850 lbs (817) 135.69; 850-900 lbs (873) 130.40; 900-950 lbs (915) 127.83. Holstein Steers: Large 3 300-350 lbs (337) 110.21; 800-850 lbs (812) 75.10; 850-900 lbs (886) 73.89. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (324) 164.89; 350-400 lbs (374) 160.29; 400-450 lbs (424) 155.21; 450-500 lbs (477) 153.06; 500-550 lbs (521) 148.06; 550-600 lbs (576) 143.93; 600-650 lbs (627) 141.57; 650-700 lbs (675) 140.20; 700-750 lbs (727) 136.30; 750-800 lbs (769) 128.78; 800-850 lbs (816) 124.31; 850-900 lbs (876) 117.55; 900-950 lbs (904) 112.22. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (340) 160.36; 350-400 lbs (374) 159.24; 400-450 lbs (428) 148.68; 450-500 lbs (478) 145.12; 500-550 lbs (525) 141.80; 550-600 lbs (572) 139.71; 600-650 lbs (627) 136.82; 650-700 lbs (673) 136.42; 700-750 lbs (729) 132.10; 750-800 lbs (764) 122.29.

Arkansas 8800. 27 pct over 600 lbs. 41 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (322) 181.28; 350-400 lbs (372) 173.66; 400-450 lbs (421) 167.63; 450-500 lbs (474) 159.71; 500-550 lbs (519) 156.30; 550-600 lbs (571) 150.17; 600-650 lbs (622) 146.19; 650-700 lbs (669) 143.96. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (329) 158.73; 350-400 lbs (373) 151.64; 400-450 lbs (423) 148.99; 450-500 lbs (473) 142.59; 500-550 lbs (520) 140.20; 550-600 lbs (568) 136.21; 600-650 lbs (621) 130.91; 650-700 lbs (678) 128.29.

 

 

 

 

 

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Thursday, June 21, 2018 10:52 AM