Economic Impact Study Shows Livestock Markets Important For Rural Vitality; $1M In Total Value-Added Dollars To Community

Kansas City, Mo. – A 2017 economic impact study found that livestock auction markets are important for the vitality of rural communities. The study of a standard, fixed-facility auction market revealed that the market provides approximately $1 million in total value-added dollars to its local community (population of 5,000) annually. Key findings also showed that markets create jobs and contribute substantially in taxes and labor income.
The case livestock auction market is located in northwest Iowa and has a weekly cattle sale, selling all classes of cattle. The market was selected as a representative example of Livestock Marketing Association (LMA) member-markets based on type of market, gross sales of livestock, rural location of market, and population of city. LMA represents 75 percent of the livestock auction markets in the United States, and cattle are the largest per-head species sold through livestock auction markets annually (31 million head, per 2016 USDA GIPSA Annual Report data).
Also from the key findings: the market studied provides nearly 30 jobs, generating $600,000 in labor income to the community’s economy. Additionally, the market contributes $70,000 in local taxes. In federal taxes, the market contributes $125,000. Of the total value-added number, approximately $30,000 is contributed by the on-site café, operational only on sale days and managed by a resident church (proceeds retained by church).
Speaking on rural vitality, LMA President, Jerry Etheredge said, “Livestock markets are extremely important to their local communities. They generate cash for local farmers and that cash gets traded in town. For those rural communities, employment opportunities at a market are a big deal.”
In collaboration with the LMA, the study was completed by Decision Innovation Solutions in Urbandale, Iowa.

Low Water Levels Putting Farmland At Risk

Denver (AP) – The draining of a massive aquifer that underlies portions of eight states in the central U.S. is drying up streams, causing fish to disappear and threatening the livelihood of farmers who rely on it for their crops.
Water levels in the Ogallala aquifer have been dropping for decades as irrigators pump water faster than rainfall can recharge it.
An analysis of federal data found the Ogallala aquifer shrank twice as fast over the past six years compared with the previous 60, The Denver Post reports.
The drawdown has become so severe that streams are drying at a rate of 6 miles per year and some highly resilient fish are disappearing. In rural areas, farmers and ranchers worry they will no longer have enough water for their livestock and crops as the aquifer is depleted.
The aquifer lost 10.7 million acre-feet of storage between 2013 and 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey said in a June report.
“Now I never know, from one minute to the next, when I turn on a faucet or hydrant, whether there will be water or not,” said Lois Scott, 75, who lives west of Cope, Colorado, north of the frequently bone-dry bed of the Arikaree River.
A 40-foot well her grandfather dug by hand in 1914 gave water until recently, she said, lamenting the loss of lawns where children once frolicked and green pastures for cows. Scott’s now considering a move to Brush, Colorado, and leaving her family’s historic homestead farm.
“This will truly become the Great American Desert,” she said.
Also known as the High Plains Aquifer, the Ogallala underlies 175,000 square miles (453,000 square kilometers), including parts of Colorado, Wyoming Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota and Texas. That’s one of the primary agricultural regions of the U.S., producing $35 billion in crops annually.
Farmers and ranchers have been tapping into the aquifer since the 1930s to boost production and help them get by in times of drought.
However, overpumping has dried up 358 miles of surface rivers and streams across a 200-square-mile area covering eastern Colorado, western Kansas and Nebraska, according to researchers from Colorado State University and Kansas State University.
If farmers keep pumping water at the current pace, another 177 miles of rivers and streams will be lost before 2060, the researchers determined.
“We have almost completely changed the species of fish that can survive in those streams, compared with what was there historically. This is really a catastrophic change,” said Kansas State University conservation biologist Keith Gido, one of the authors of a report on the aquifer published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
If all pumping stopped immediately, it would still take hundreds of years for rain-fed streams and rivers to recharge the aquifer, Gido said.

Winds, Floods And Fire: U.S. Ties Record For Costly Weather

Washington (AP) – Howling winds, deadly floods, fire and ice so far this year have pushed the U.S. into a tie for weather disasters that topped in $1 billion in damages.
There have been 15 costly disasters through September, tying 2011 for the most billion-dollar weather disasters for the first nine months of a year. The record for a year is 16, and the hurricane season is not over yet.
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released the figures Oct. 6 that include three hurricanes, three tornado outbreaks, four severe storms, two floods, a drought, a freeze and wildfires.
NOAA climate scientist Adam Smith said 2017 is shaping up to be an unprecedented year. It is likely to tie or break the record for the most number of billion-dollar weather disasters set in 2005, the year of Hurricane Katrina and other deadly storms.
NOAA hasn’t calculated the costs from hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, but an outside disaster risk company estimates the U.S. damage from the three hurricanes to be around $150 billion. The remaining disasters so far this year have cost more than $21.7 billion and killed 282 people, according to NOAA.
Damage figures are adjusted for inflation; records for billion-dollar disasters go back to 1980.
Between 1980 and 2007, the U.S. averaged only four billion-dollar disasters per year. In the decade since, the country has averaged 11 per year.
Experts blame a combination of factors.
“Climate change is impacting extreme weather in ways we hadn’t anticipated,” Michael Mann of Pennsylvania State University said in an email.
But an even bigger factor is that more people moving into harm’s way “has created massive amounts of exposure in regions prone to severe weather events,” said Mark Bove, a meteorologist at insurance giant Munich Re.

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 43,600

Texas 20,800. 97 pct over 600 lbs. 32 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 660 lbs 168.30; 700-725 lbs 160.08; 750-790 lbs 159.66; 800-840 lbs 157.28; 850-875 lbs 154.21; Dec 750 lbs 158.90; Jan 625 lbs 166.25; 800 lbs 155.20; May 700 lbs 154.50; Del Current 745 lbs 166.00; 750-775 lbs 163.04; 800-825 lbs 161.54; Dec 775 lbs 159.00; 800 lbs 158.60; Jan 750 lbs 154.95; 800 lbs 154.95; 800 lbs 155.82. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 540 lbs 186.85, 525 lbs 170.00 Mex; 660-680 lbs 161.94; 700-740 lbs 155.14; 750-788 lbs 156.53; 820 lbs 148.41; Dec 660 lbs 156.77; Jan 725 lbs 155.40; 775 lbs 149.09; Feb 775 lbs 146.40; Del Current 660-695 lbs 166.93; 700-735 lbs 164.30; 750-775 lbs 162.02; 800-840 lbs 159.00; 860 lbs 155.00; 900 lbs 149.00; Dec 675 lbs 165.00; 825 lbs 154.50. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 540 lbs 158.50; 595 lbs 149.00; 700-730 lbs 154.78; Jan 675 lbs 154.57; 700-725 lbs 151.47; 750 lbs 148.00; Feb 700 lbs 144.60; 775 lbs 146.25; Del Current 625 lbs 157.10; 725 lbs 153.68; 750 lbs 156.00; Dec 675 lbs 156.00; 750 lbs 155.60; Jan 650 lbs 159.00; 700-725 lbs 151.00; 750 lbs 150.50; Feb 700-725 lbs 142.99; 775 lbs 147.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 625-635 lbs 152.14; 685 lbs 154.84; Dec 750 lbs 143.50; Del Current 550 lbs 166.00; 665 lbs 158.00; 700-730 lbs 154.77; 750-770 lbs 150.48; Dec 750 lbs 151.00.

Oklahoma 1000. 92 pct over 600 lbs. 8 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current 545 lbs 178.22; 800 lbs 159.92. Medium and Large 1-2 Current 725-745 lbs 160.28; 775 lbs 161.50. Heifers: Medium and Large 1-2 Dec 675 lbs 154.50.

New Mexico 2700. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 70 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current 775 lbs 164.88; Dec 700 lbs 163.31; 775 lbs 156.00. Medium and Large 1-2 Current 765-775 lbs 158.90; 840 lbs 156.89. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current 725 lbs 156.60.

Kansas 6700. 98 pct over 600 lbs. 50 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 725 lbs 162.72; 775 lbs 156.72; 800-825 lbs 160.72; Jan 800 lbs 153.15; Del Current 775 lbs 167.00; 800 lbs 164.00. Medium and Large 1-2 Del Current 540-545 lbs 186.53; 660-675 lbs 165.53; 725-740 lbs 161.55; 750-760 lbs 160.89; 800 lbs 161.00; Jan 775 lbs 153.00; Feb 775 lbs 150.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 675 lbs 158.00; 750-760 lbs 152.73; Del 725 lbs 159.10.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — November 10
National feeder cattle receipts: 358,200

Steers and heifers sold $1-5 higher, with some markets quoted up to $8 higher. One of the most talked about subjects currently in auctions is the readily available status of calves; weaned and unweaned. Demand was moderate to good Nov. 10 for calves that were preconditioned and weaned for an appropriate amount of time. While demand was light for calves with no shots or only one round of shots. Very good demand for yearlings early in the week after Nov. 3 much higher fed cattle market; however the luster has come off that apple as analysts surmised that both the CME cattle complex appeared to be oversold and have now come off of their contract highs of Halloween week. With the current price structure of the CME Live Cattle contracts the best demand is for yearlings and for those big calves that will finish before the summer months. Market reporters have noted less crowds in attendance at sales due to farmers and ranchers wanting to finish harvest and complete fall tillage work before taking on some more chores with winter fast approaching. In Philip SD on Nov. 7, two loads of steers that averaged 733 lbs with all the bells and whistles sold at $185. The YTD average steer carcass weight reported through September for 2017 is at 812 lbs; 13 lbs below a year ago and 9 lbs below the previous year average. Total cattle slaughter is around 1.4 million more than 2016 and just a mere 9K more than the previous three year average. The most dramatic jump in YTD slaughter rate for January to September is the heifer slaughter which has posted near 670K head more. Choice boxed beef closed Nov. 10 at $213.85; $5.11 higher than Nov. 3. For the second week in a row, total receipts on this report topped 400K; the last time that occurred was w/e 1/11 and 1/18 in 2013.

Texas 8400. 53 pct over 600 lbs. 42 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (372) 179.31; 450-500 lbs (490) 164.58; 500-550 lbs (531) 164.40; 550-600 lbs (575) 155.69; part load 694 lbs 162.00; 700-750 lbs (732) 160.62; 750-800 lbs (774) 158.40; 800-850 lbs (816) 153.77. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (326) 174.87; 350-400 lbs (388) 179.25; 400-450 lbs (423) 165.74; 450-500 lbs (475) 159.74; 500-550 lbs (531) 149.91; 550-600 lbs (571) 138.58; 600-650 lbs (621) 143.30; 650-700 lbs (665) 145.83; 750-800 lbs (780) 153.19; 850-900 lbs (863) 140.16. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (382) 165.42; 400-450 lbs (437) 155.02; 450-500 lbs (482) 146.71; 500-550 lbs (520) 139.13; 550-600 lbs (561) 140.36; part load 618 lbs 147.00; 700-750 lbs (721) 148.75; 750-800 lbs (757) 145.17; 800-850 lbs (843) 137.02. Medium and Large 1-2 500-550 lbs (519) 130.51; 550-600 lbs (584) 132.14; 600-650 lbs (638) 125.17; 650-700 lbs (682) 151.40; 700-750 lbs (737) 134.59.

Oklahoma 39,200. 51 pct over 600 lbs. 40 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (327) 203.40; 350-400 lbs (376) 197.47; 400-450 lbs (426) 184.52; 450-500 lbs (470) 178.39; 500-550 lbs (521) 175.13; 550-600 lbs (579) 166.40; 600-650 lbs (627) 166.26; 650-700 lbs (671) 165.98; 700-750 lbs (718) 164.21; 750-800 lbs (773) 164.73; 800-850 lbs (817) 162.73; 850-900 lbs (873) 157.76; 900-950 lbs (929) 155.55; 950-1000 lbs (973) 150.87. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (329) 185.64; 350-400 lbs (374) 181.84; 400-450 lbs (430) 176.26; 450-500 lbs (478) 168.51; 500-550 lbs (525) 163.62; 550-600 lbs (570) 157.14; 600-650 lbs (622) 157.59; 650-700 lbs (671) 160.63; 700-750 lbs (725) 157.46; 750-800 lbs (778) 157.91; 800-850 lbs (810) 154.99; 850-900 lbs (870) 153.82. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 250-300 lbs (289) 164.31; 300-350 lbs (327) 166.05; 350-400 lbs (376) 159.16; 400-450 lbs (424) 159.16; 450-500 lbs (475) 152.98; 500-550 lbs (520) 153.03; 550-600 lbs (576) 152.56; 600-650 lbs (621) 157.09; 650-700 lbs (676) 158.12; 700-750 lbs (722) 156.96; 750-800 lbs (766) 147.07; 800-850 lbs (808) 150.18; 850-900 lbs (866) 135.53; 900-950 lbs (930) 143.15; 950-1000 lbs (956) 142.12. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (326) 152.51; 350-400 lbs (380) 154.37; 400-450 lbs (426) 150.67; 450-500 lbs (476) 149.80; 500-550 lbs (519) 144.66; 550-600 lbs (573) 143.98; 600-650 lbs (620) 147.66; 650-700 lbs (673) 150.91; 700-750 lbs (720) 154.41; 750-800 lbs (764) 148.20; 800-850 lbs (823) 148.67; 850-900 lbs (866) 149.52.

New Mexico 9200. 33 pct over 600 lbs. 37 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (384) 192.17; 400-450 lbs (428) 182.73; 450-500 lbs (480) 173.14; 500550 lbs (526) 169.22; 550-600 lbs (578) 157.01; 800-850 lbs (842) 137.73. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (382) 190.49; 400-450 lbs (425) 182.52; 450-500 lbs (468) 174.12; 500-550 lbs (522) 165.93; 550-600 lbs (585) 153.79; 600-650 lbs (622) 147.22; 650-700 lbs (678) 140.89; 700-750 lbs (718) 129.63; 750-800 lbs (758) 142.44; 800-850 lbs (835) 136.67. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (425) 161.93; 450-500 lbs (476) 145.35; 500-550 lbs (522) 143.39; 550-600 lbs (573) 137.35. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (326) 178.72; 350-400 lbs (372) 171.63; 400-450 lbs (427) 163.70; 450-500 lbs (469) 157.99; 500-550 lbs (526) 145.32; 550-600 lbs (575) 137.54; 600-650 lbs (632) 129.36.

Kansas 16,800. 54 pct over 600 lbs. 38 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (330) 227.49; 350-400 lbs (379) 209.07; 400-450 lbs (424) 197.39; 450-500 lbs (483) 193.47; 500-550 lbs (521) 183.50; 550-600 lbs (570) 175.19; 600-650 lbs (627) 167.71; 650-700 lbs (676) 164.24; 700-750 lbs (718) 159.06; 750-800 lbs (775) 163.13; 800-850 lbs (846) 168.79; 850-900 lbs (867) 163.19; 900-950 lbs (922) 160.93; 950-1000 lbs (961) 154.90. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (394) 194.20; 400-450 lbs (432) 190.29; 450-500 lbs (474) 182.75; 500-550 lbs (525) 176.43; 550-600 lbs (576) 165.95; 600-650 lbs (632) 162.65; 650-700 lbs (675) 155.73; 700-750 lbs (717) 158.76; 750-800 lbs (780) 155.07; 850-900 lbs (868) 156.32; 900-950 lbs (939) 150.49; few loads 998 lbs 148.25. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (375) 185.99; 400-450 lbs (439) 179.66; 450-500 lbs (475) 166.88; 500-550 lbs (522) 164.61; 550-600 lbs (575) 156.50; 600-650 lbs (626) 153.42; 650-700 lbs (661) 155.57; 700-750 lbs (732) 148.46; 750-800 lbs (783) 152.87; 800-850 lbs (825) 151.42; 850-900 lbs (889) 143.61; 900-950 lbs (931) 140.75. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (378) 170.32; 400-450 lbs (434) 166.18; 450-500 lbs (478) 159.64; 500-550 lbs (528) 154.38; 550-600 lbs (568) 150.21; 600-650 lbs (631) 147.90; 700-750 lbs (717) 139.80.

Missouri 40,800. 42 pct over 600 lbs. 41 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (329) 204.64; 350-400 lbs (377) 192.65; 400-450 lbs (423) 186.45; 450-500 lbs (475) 180.63; 500-550 lbs (525) 174.80; 550-600 lbs (572) 170.21; 600-650 lbs (625) 166.48; 650-700 lbs (674) 162.15; 700-750 lbs (724) 164.49; 750-800 lbs (778) 164.48; 800-850 lbs (822) 163.82; 850-900 lbs (860) 163.97; 900-950 lbs (924) 159.40; 950-1000 lbs (958) 151.95. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (325) 182.56; 350-400 lbs (375) 176.67; 400-450 lbs (428) 170.54; 450-500 lbs (476) 164.87; 500-550 lbs (527) 162.94; 550-600 lbs (577) 156.06; 600-650 lbs (623) 156.35; 650-700 lbs (673) 152.87; 700-750 lbs (719) 154.88; 750-800 lbs (773) 155.01; 800-850 lbs (817) 150.07; 850-900 lbs (869) 145.35. Holstein Steers: Large 3 450-500 lbs (468) 104.84; 550-600 lbs (574) 103.96; 600-650 lbs (627) 96.35; 750-800 lbs (767) 90.72; 800-850 lbs (822) 94.23; part load 1022 lbs 89.75. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (333) 167.80; 350-400 lbs (368) 165.75; 400-450 lbs (428) 159.21; 450-500 lbs (478) 156.34; 500-550 lbs (525) 155.63; 550-600 lbs (575) 154.93; 600-650 lbs (625) 154.20; 650-700 lbs (668) 156.51; 700-750 lbs (720) 149.31; 750-800 lbs (773) 146.80; 800-850 lbs (833) 139.94; 850-900 lbs (873) 135.51; 950-1000 lbs (987) 134.39. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (321) 153.31; 350-400 lbs (376) 153.27; 400-450 lbs (426) 146.33; 450-500 lbs (479) 145.62; 500-550 lbs (528) 146.07; 550-600 lbs (572) 141.55; 600-650 lbs (621) 145.84; 650-700 lbs (676) 144.21; 700-750 lbs (719) 144.11; 750-800 lbs (780) 140.84; 800-850 lbs (818) 139.15; 850-900 lbs (894) 142.13.

Arkansas 11,300. 19 pct over 600 lbs. 39 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (324) 184.51; 350-400 lbs (375) 178.82; 400-450 lbs (423) 171.05; 450-500 lbs (473) 165.90; 500-550 lbs (522) 160.89; 550-600 lbs (572) 154.18; 600-650 lbs (620) 149.03; 650-700 lbs (670) 145.10. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (325) 157.21; 350-400 lbs (372) 151.89; 400-450 lbs (423) 147.40; 450-500 lbs (475) 142.89; 500-550 lbs (525) 138.39; 550-600 lbs (571) 137.93; 600-650 lbs (626) 135.53; 650-700 lbs (672) 134.57.

 

 

 

 

 

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Friday, November 17, 2017 12:59 PM