Pork Producers Campaign For USMCA Trade Deal

By Chris Clayton
DTN Ag Policy Editor

Omaha (DTN) – The National Pork Producer Council is starting another campaign to get Congress to pass the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement before the end of the year.
Nick Giordano, NPPC’s vice president and counsel for global government affairs, told DTN NPPC made a judgement last summer to push hard for Congress to complete the trade deal before the end of 2019. Right now, hog farmers “are getting antsy” that negotiations between House Democrats and the Trump administration could carry into 2020.
“Our best judgement was the deal would come up around Thanksgiving or in December,” Giordano said. “We’re still very hopeful we get that vote before the end of the year.” He added, “Our producers want the certainty of continued North American trade,” Giordano said. “They saw the impact of punitive tariffs. It really tied them in knots and it was a huge financial problem for the industry. We want that certainty and we want that vote this year.”
Giordano added that NPPC members want a vote this year, but also want to see the deal pass by a robust margin. “We want to see support for trade.”
The NPPC campaign is somewhat lighthearted, “It’s Pork O’Clock Somewhere” and highlights different meals in Canada and Mexico from pulled pork poutine in Canada to tacos el pastor in Mexico, as well as BBQ pork sandwiches in the U.S.
“It’s just kind of the next stage of our overall campaign,” Giordano said. “USMCA is something NPPC has always been in support of, even when the Mexican metal tariffs were in place. That’s how valuable the Mexican market is to us.”
Talks continue both internally and internationally as Democratic leaders seek more assurances on labor and environmental enforcement, especially in Mexico. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau also hosted a handful of Democratic congressmen on Nov. 6, including Ways and Means Chairman Richard Neal of Massachusetts, who would shepherd the trade pact through the House. While Mexico has already ratified USMCA, Canada is waiting for the U.S. with the possibility of its parliament voting basically in concert with Congress.
Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue also has been leading a trade mission with more than 100 agricultural and government people to Mexico. Perdue’s Twitter feed shows him with Mexico’s agriculture minister championing ties with the National Football League as well, which has a game scheduled in Mexico City later this month.
Supporters of the trade in Congress, such as Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, have cautioned that allowing USMCA to carry into 2020 would tie up the trade deal in presidential politics. Congress would be less likely to take a vote until after the presidential election is settled. While time is ticking away, the House is focusing much of its attention on impeachment proceedings and also has to resolve budget and appropriations bills in the coming weeks as well.
Agricultural groups have largely been at the forefront of supporting the USCMA, partly because agricultural commodities have been among the products most frequently hit with tariffs during trade disputes in the Trump administration.
A year ago, Mexico had 20% tariffs on U.S. pork that effectively translated into taking $12 off every hog sold by farmers. President Donald Trump removed steel and aluminum tariffs against Mexico and Canada back in May, prompting Mexico to lift its tariffs as well.
“Pork producers are in a much better shape than they were this time last year,” Giordano said. “It’s not a panacea for pork producers, but they are a helluva lot better off than they were this time last year.”
The U.S. Meat Export Federation noted that pork exports to Mexico have rebounded since Mexico removed its tariffs in May, but pork sales to Mexico have not recovered to their record pre-tariff levels of 2017. Through the first nine months of 2019, pork exports to Mexico were down 10% in volume and 9% in value with $919.4 million in sales of pork and variety meats.
Combined, the North American market of Mexico and Canada make up about just under 31% of pork exports and larger in sales than to Japan, the largest single sales market for U.S. pork.
The NPPC campaign information can be found at https://www.porkoclock.org/.

Hemp Farmers Become Eligible For USDA Programs

By Chris Clayton
DTN Ag Policy Editor

Omaha (DTN) – Farmers who choose to grow hemp under USDA rules will have to face the risk that their crop could test “hot” and lead to the destruction of their crop without a crop insurance indemnity even if they have a license to grow hemp.
USDA on Oct. 29 announced its interim final rule for hemp will go into effect on Oct. 31 when the rule and its various provisions are published in the Federal Register. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said the department had “all hands on deck” to get the rules out for the 2020 growing season, which will be used to “test drive” hemp production nationally.
“At USDA, we are always excited when there are new economic opportunities for our farmers, and we hope the ability to grow hemp will pave the way for new products and markets,” Perdue said.
Perdue added, “I encourage all producers to take the time to fully educate themselves on the processes, requirements and risks that come with any new market or product before entering this new frontier.”
Hemp farmers will also become eligible for a number of USDA programs, including loans, some whole-farm crop insurance policies, disaster assistance and conservation programs. All of these various programs will be available starting in the 2020 crop year.
Diversified producers will be able to buy whole-farm revenue protection if they have a five-year crop history, though veterans and beginning farmers can buy the insurance with three years of crop history. Hemp farmers will also be eligible to buy Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) policies as well, said Bill Northey, USDA’s undersecretary for farm production and conservation, “which will give them essentially insurance coverage in an adverse weather event.”
To tap into USDA programs, farmers will need licenses through their growing state or tribe to grow the crop and will need to file acreage reports at local Farm Service Agency offices with details on where the crop is being grown, including greenhouses. USDA also wants to know the intended use for the hemp in those reports, whether it’s for fiber, grain, seed or cannabidiol (CBD) products.
The FSA acreage submissions will also provide better detail for actual production of hemp by state. Right now, USDA only has estimates from private sources. The group Vote Hemp issued a report earlier this year that more than 510,000 hemp acres were licensed this year in 34 states, but actual planted acres may have been closer to 230,000 acres.
Greg Ibach, USDA’s undersecretary for marketing and regulatory programs, noted some of the key questions sent to USDA involve testing. USDA will require testing by labs registered with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency. Sampling will be one within 15 days before harvest by a USDA-approved sampling agent, or a federal or state law-enforcement agent. USDA will provide details for sampling, including how to collect a statistically valid sample from a field.
USDA will approve state plans with slightly different sampling protocols if officials think they will create comparable testing results.
Under the farm bill, the chemical Delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) must be limited to 0.3% on a dry weight basis. USDA said measurement will take into account uncertainty and variations in sampling or testing procedures. Still, a test above 0.5% THC will translate into a negligent violation that will cause the crop to be destroyed.
An Oklahoma reporter asked USDA officials on a press call about the risks of high-THC tests because of weather variability in areas such as in the High Plains. That would lead to the crop being destroyed. Ibach and Northey said that is a risk farmers will have to face.
“Just like every other crop has its risks and rewards – sometimes we have weather conditions that cause wheat to be low protein and not as valuable in the marketplace, or sometimes we have droughts that cause aflatoxin problems in other crops – hemp is not without its production risks and difficulties either,” Ibach said.
Ibach said farmers need to learn about hemp seed varieties to plant in their area that will be suitable. “So that is something producers need to be cognizant of as they move forward,” he said.
Crop insurance also will not cover losses from hemp that has to be destroyed because of too much THC, Northey said.
The farm bill allows states to choose if they want to authorize hemp production. Four states right now have no legislation allowing hemp production: Idaho, Mississippi, New Hampshire and South Dakota. Farmers in states that do not allow hemp simply won’t be allowed to grow it in those states.
Some states submitted plans to USDA several months ago. Ibach said USDA will review plans as soon as possible to get responses back to the states, and nearly all of them have placed their state department of agriculture as the oversight agency. Ibach noted there may be a few states that allow growing hemp, but decline to set up a program.
“In that case, the statute provides that USDA provide a way for those hemp producers to obtain their license through USDA,” Ibach said.
While USDA now has its rules out, other agencies are moving slower at the moment. The big challenge lies with the Food and Drug Administration and how it treats the broad range of CBD oil products now on the market without FDA approval. The Grocery Manufacturers Association issued a report citing that consumers are confused about CBD products and whether they are safe. The trade association cited that one-in-three Americans have used a CBD product and the overwhelming majority, 76%, believe CBD products are already subject to federal regulations. GMA called on FDA to bring some clarity to the growth in cannabidiol products.
“It is the role of federal agencies to ensure a safe and transparent consumer marketplace – but the CBD market is currently the Wild West,” said GMA President and CEO Geoff Freeman. “Without a uniform federal regulatory framework in place, consumers lack the basic information they need to make informed decisions about CBD.”
CBD is the big market for hemp in the U.S. right now with sales at just under $2 billion last year and a forecast that sales could top $20 billion in less than a decade, according to the Colorado firm BDS Analytics. It is the CBD market that is generating revenue for at least some farmers of $50,000 an acre or more to produce CBD oil in their plants.
EPA also closed a public comment period in September on 10 different pesticides that could be used on hemp and the agency is working through a pathway for pesticide registration.
More details on USDA’s hemp program, including the interim final rule, can be found at https://www.ams.usda.gov/rules-regulations/hemp..

Calving Starts Earlier When Temps Are High

By Victoria G. Myers
Progressive Farmer Senior Editor

Most printed gestation tables for beef cattle will tell you calving takes between 283 and 285 days. What those tables don’t mention is how temperature can shorten up gestation times in both cows and heifers.
Glenn Selk, Oklahoma State University emeritus Extension animal scientist, says OSU physiologists looked at data from 60 Angus/Hereford crossbred cows, and found a definite impact on calving times tied to temperature. Their observations were done over two calving seasons.
Fall-calving cows and heifers were all been artificially inseminated in early November, or early January. Semen from the same sire was used for all. They were all exposed to a single cleanup bull for 35 days (four days post-AI). Weather prior to calving was significantly different for the two groups.
Average maximum temps the week before calving was 93 degrees F for what were considered the early fall group (August). For the late fall group (October) average maximum temperature was 66 degrees F, nearly 30 degrees difference.
Both groups had 100% survival rates and very high re-breeding rates (90% and 92%, respectively). But the length of gestation was nearly a full week shorter (six days) in the August-calving crowd the first year (279 days versus 285 days); and four days shorter the second year (278 days versus 282 days). Selk stresses the gestation times are averages, meaning about half of the cows actually calved earlier.
The takeaway, says Selk, is that producers with fall-calving cows should expect to see calves coming several days ahead of those textbook gestation tables. He recommends doing routine heifer and cow checks seven to 10 days ahead of that expected first calving date.

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 49,600

Texas 13,600. 95 over 600 lbs. 46 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 600-650 lbs 144.00-149.00; 650-700 lbs 148.50; 750-800 lbs 144.00-152.25; 800-850 lbs 144.00-144.35; Current Del 450-500 lbs 172.00; 700-750 lbs 148.00-152.00; 750-800 lbs 145.00-154.50; 800-850 lbs 143.00-147.00; Nov-Dec FOB 800-850 lbs 143.00; Dec FOB 750-800 lbs 143.50; 800-850 lbs 140.25; Jan FOB 650-700 lbs 146.50; 700-750 lbs 140.00; 750-800 lbs 138.50; Nov-Dec Del 700-750 lbs 145.00; Dec Del 800-850 lbs 145.00; Jan Del 800-850 lbs 142.00-145.00; 850-900 lbs 140.50. Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB 700-750 lbs 139.00-145.00; 750-800 lbs 145.16-147.12; 800-850 lbs 139.50-146.00; 850-900 lbs 138.92-143.00; Current Del 600-650 lbs 141.00; 650-700 lbs 147.00-148.00; 700-750 lbs 145.00-149.00; 750-800 lbs 146.00-149.00; 800-850 lbs 144.00; 850-900 lbs 137.00; Nov-Dec FOB 750-800 lbs 140.84; Dec FOB 650-700 lbs 139.05; 700-750 lbs 140.62; 750-800 lbs 144.84. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 550-600 lbs 138.00-148.85; 600-650 lbs 139.00; 700-750 lbs 138.85-143.00; 800-850 lbs 135.00; Current Del 600-650 lbs 146.00-148.00; Dec FOB 700-750 lbs 135.50-139.50; 750-800 lbs 134.50; Jan FOB 650-700 lbs 139.00; 700-750 lbs 134.50-135.00; 750-800 lbs 134.10-134.50; Dec Del 700-750 lbs 136.00; 750-800 lbs 138.00; Jan Del 750-800 lbs 134.50-136.00; Feb Del 700-750 lbs 127.55. Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB 700-750 lbs 132.50; 750-800 lbs 131.42; Current Del 600-650 lbs 141.00-142.00; 650-700 lbs 138.00-140.00; 700-750 lbs 145.00; Nov-Dec FOB 750-800 lbs 130.84; Dec FOB 650-700 lbs 135.05; 700-750 lbs 135.62.

Oklahoma 3900. 99 over 600 lbs. 39 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 450-500 lbs 168.00; 700-750 lbs 149.00-150.00; 750-800 lbs 145.74-151.50; 800-850 lbs 145.00; 850-900 lbs 142.67; 900-950 lbs 141.00; Jan FOB 800-850 lbs 141.50-142.50; Dec FOB 800-850 lbs 142.50. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 600-650 lbs 141.50; Nov FOB 600-650 lbs 142.00. Medium and Large 1-2 Jan FOB 750-800 lbs 131.50-132.75.

New Mexico 1300. 100 over 600 lbs. 85 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 700-750 lbs 147.00; 800-850 lbs 144.98-145.75. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 750-800 lbs 135.75.

Kansas 4300. 96 over 600 lbs. 38 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 700-750 lbs 145.00; 800-850 lbs 139.13-143.35; Current Del 750-800 lbs 148.00-154.00; 800-850 lbs 148.00; 850-900 lbs 145.00; 900-950 lbs 144.75; Jan Del 800-850 lbs 140.75-142.30. Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB 600-650 lbs 141.46; Current Del 700-750 lbs 151.50; 900-950 lbs 142.50. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 650-700 lbs 146.00; 700-750 lbs 137.35-142.50; Current Del 600-650 lbs 144.00-147.00; Jan Del 750-800 lbs 138.67-139.70. Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB 600-650 lbs 130.46; Current Del 750-800 lbs 138.00.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — November 8
National feeder cattle receipts: 360,400

Steers and heifers sold mostly steady to $4 higher. The supply of feeders was heavy at auctions with the 360,400 head being the second largest auction receipt volume this year, behind week ending January 13 by only 6100 head. Discounts continue to be applied to calves with short or no weaning programs, but they are not nearly as severe as what was being applied a month ago. Colder weather is helping to straighten these calves out and make them a little less risky to own. Demand for light weight calves in Montana was reduced caused by dry conditions on the west coast. Transportation issues in the Northern Plains tightened demand late in the week due to limited truck availability. It’s farming time in the North Plains and farmers need those trucks hooked to their grain trailers now. Farmer feeders are still working on corn harvest in the North Plains, which is going slow as corn is wet and must be dried. This is keeping some of these buyers out of the market on calves yet as they simply don’t have the time to take on a bawling calf. Fighting the weather and the health risk that comes with placing them in a muddy, sloppy yard is not a proposition they want to get into. Yard conditions in the Dakotas remain less than ideal as rains, and snow now have remained frequent through the fall. News reports of propane rationing in the Upper Midwest and Eastern Corn Belt could delay the completion of harvest if corn is still in the field and above 20 percent moisture. There are still loads of yearlings available this time of year and they have been met with very good demand. Being able to hedge off the April CME Live Cattle contract is huge considering the near $8 premium to the June Contract. All contracts in the CME Cattle Complex have risen slowly since the recent lows around the 10th of September. Since then, the December Live Cattle contract is around $20 higher, and the January Feeder Cattle contract is almost $19 higher. Cash fed cattle prices have now eclipsed “pre-fire” levels for a couple weeks now, with feeder margins back on the positive side. Compared to Nov. 1, Southern Plains live sales were reported at $114-115 and Northern Plains dressed sales were reported at $181-182. Attractive boxed-beef values and large packer margins continue to help support higher fed cattle prices, also giving great incentives for packers to push capacity levels to take advantage of their margins. Boxed-beef cutouts continue to surge higher as beef demand remains very good with beef, especially choice product being featured in retail ads consistently even as Thanksgiving approaches. For the week, the Choice cutout closed $5.92 higher at $239.12, while Select was $5.75 higher at $213.26; putting the Choice-Select spread at $25.86. The Choice cutout is now around $2.50 shy of the most recent high of $241.74 on August 21. “post-fire”, when retailers were wanting to ensure their supply heading into Labor Day. Cattle Slaughter under federal inspection estimated at 651K for the week, 7K less than Nov. 1 and 2K more than a year ago. The September Restaurant Performance Index reported Nov. 1 posted an increase from the previous month at 100.4, down 0.3 percent from the previous month. The Expectations Index of the RPI, which measures restaurant operators’ six-month outlook for four industry indicators, stood at 101.3 in September – up slightly from a level of 101.2 in August. The forward-looking component of the RPI trended sideways in recent months, as restaurant operators remain uncertain about sales growth and the overall economy. Last month, Creighton University’s Rural Mainstreet Index was reported at 51.4, 1.3 percentage points higher than September. Although still weak, October’s level is the highest reading since June of this year. It also marked the third time in the past four months that the overall index has risen above growth neutral.

Texas 6800. 47 pct over 600 lbs. 48 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (368) 181.49; 400-450 lbs (434) 166.37; 450-500 lbs (474) 159.15; 500-550 lbs (531) 147.22; 550-600 lbs (574) 142.07; 600-650 lbs (620) 140.62; 650-700 lbs (667) 145.74; 700-750 lbs (723) 144.05; 750-800 lbs (791) 143.18; pkg 806 lbs 144.00. Medium and Large 1-2 450-500 lbs (476) 141.61; 500-550 lbs (539) 135.12; 550-600 lbs (575) 132.48; 600-650 lbs (612) 134.57; 650-700 lbs (680) 125.04; 700-750 lbs (728) 123.94. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (331) 147.67; 350-400 lbs (372) 141.70; 400-450 lbs (422) 144.51; 450-500 lbs (472) 134.77; 500-550 lbs (526) 131.71; 550-600 lbs (591) 130.47; 600-650 lbs (617) 135.47; 650-700 lbs (675) 138.03; 700-750 lbs (721) 122.80; 750-800 lbs (755) 137.81; part load 948 lbs 126.50. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (370) 133.15; 400-450 lbs (430) 134.87; 450-500 lbs (468) 130.54; 500-550 lbs (523) 125.95; 550-600 lbs (574) 118.63; 600-650 lbs (634) 113.94; 700-750 lbs (748) 138.41.

Oklahoma 39,600. 47 pct over 600 lbs. 41 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (325) 177.87; 350-400 lbs (373) 176.66; 400-450 lbs (427) 171.70; 450-500 lbs (472) 166.85; 500-550 lbs (528) 156.78; 550-600 lbs (572) 149.70; 600-650 lbs (627) 146.76; 650-700 lbs (670) 147.01; 700-750 lbs (726) 147.25; 750-800 lbs (770) 147.63; 800-850 lbs (817) 148.61; 850-900 lbs (875) 145.19; 900-950 lbs (922) 140.49; 950-1000 lbs (984) 138.70; 1050-1100 lbs (1060) 127.92. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (322) 168.24; 350-400 lbs (373) 167.26; 400-450 lbs (428) 159.39; 450-500 lbs (477) 155.37; 500-550 lbs (527) 144.51; 550-600 lbs (571) 145.83; 600-650 lbs (620) 140.58; 650-700 lbs (674) 139.72; 700-750 lbs (724) 140.52; 750-800 lbs (769) 144.03; 800-850 lbs (823) 138.49; 900-950 lbs (909) 132.04; few loads 963 lbs 127.00; pkg 1051 lbs 124.00. Dairy Steers: Large 3 pkg 364 lbs 57.50; pkg 475 lbs 67.50. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (326) 149.54; 350-400 lbs (381) 146.27; 400-450 lbs (424) 141.29; 450-500 lbs (473) 137.83; 500-550 lbs (527) 134.72; 550-600 lbs (577) 131.51; 600-650 lbs (628) 135.73; 650-700 lbs (669) 142.00; 700-750 lbs (715) 141.48; 750-800 lbs (769) 139.20; 800-850 lbs (815) 136.86; 900-950 lbs (912) 125.65; pkg 1095 lbs 117.50. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (335) 136.90; 350-400 lbs (380) 139.48; 400-450 lbs (430) 137.56; 450-500 lbs (481) 133.57; 500-550 lbs (527) 126.59; 550-600 lbs (573) 131.78; 600-650 lbs (628) 130.75; 650-700 lbs (674) 132.11; 700-750 lbs (731) 129.34; 750-800 lbs (774) 128.71; 800-850 lbs (831) 129.30.

New Mexico 5200. 34 pct over 600 lbs. 42 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (338) 178.50; 400-450 lbs (425) 166.71; 450-500 lbs (474) 155.41; 500-550 lbs (528) 149.51; 550-600 lbs (567) 141.73; 700-750 lbs (720) 132.88. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (336) 171.23; 350-400 lbs (390) 167.49; 400-450 lbs (419) 166.28; 450-500 lbs (484) 151.62; 500-550 lbs (523) 146.89; 550-600 lbs (577) 139.59; 600-650 lbs (625) 138.28; 650-700 lbs (682) 133.67; 700-750 lbs (729) 132.37; 800-850 lbs (817) 124.02. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (382) 149.17; 400-450 lbs (420) 142.88; 450-500 lbs (476) 136.70; 500-550 lbs (527) 131.82; 550-600 lbs (563) 127.13; 600-650 lbs (622) 125.87; 750-800 lbs (771) 121.41; 900-950 lbs (915) 117.39. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (377) 147.49; 400-450 lbs (428) 140.38; 450-500 lbs (471) 137.02; 500-550 lbs (523) 128.23; 550-600 lbs (572) 124.51; 600-650 lbs (642) 128.45; 700-750 lbs (714) 122.10.

Kansas 16,100. 57 pct over 600 lbs. 43 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (338) 181.61; 350-400 lbs (374) 183.85; 400-450 lbs (423) 173.42; 450-500 lbs (474) 172.02; 500-550 lbs (528) 161.84; 550-600 lbs (576) 155.75; 600-650 lbs (615) 151.76; 650-700 lbs (678) 150.24; 700-750 lbs (721) 147.27; 750-800 lbs (780) 151.52; 800-850 lbs (829) 149.06; 850-900 lbs (872) 151.11; 900-950 lbs (920) 147.05; 950-1000 lbs (958) 144.96; 1050-1100 lbs (1081) 133.63; few loads 1109 lbs 134.00. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (364) 168.80; 450-500 lbs (485) 164.39; 500-550 lbs (531) 155.92; 550-600 lbs (578) 145.60; 600-650 lbs (626) 142.96; 650-700 lbs (674) 143.16; 700-750 lbs (719) 142.12; 750-800 lbs (778) 141.86. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (369) 170.15; 400-450 lbs (434) 152.15; 450-500 lbs (481) 149.69; 500-550 lbs (526) 142.08; 550-600 lbs (584) 142.26; 600-650 lbs (619) 141.71; 650-700 lbs (677) 145.49; 700-750 lbs (736) 143.03; 750-800 lbs (783) 142.15; 800-850 lbs (821) 139.53; 850-900 lbs (883) 136.31; pkg 930 lbs 133.25; part load 1012 lbs 125.50. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (381) 135.07; 400-450 lbs (431) 138.92; 450-500 lbs (476) 135.80; 500-550 lbs (527) 135.26; 550-600 lbs (575) 132.19; 600-650 lbs (630) 131.17; 650-700 lbs (666) 131.87; 700-750 lbs (732) 127.79; 900-950 lbs (909) 121.03.

Missouri 33,900. 50 pct over 600 lbs. 40 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (321) 176.73; 350-400 lbs (379) 178.00; 400-450 lbs (424) 173.60; 450-500 lbs (479) 165.19; 500-550 lbs (524) 161.58; 550-600 lbs (574) 157.44; 600-650 lbs (625) 150.17; 650-700 lbs (677) 151.93; 700-750 lbs (719) 150.45; 750-800 lbs (771) 148.51; 800-850 lbs (821) 150.06; 850-900 lbs (873) 141.92; 900-950 lbs (912) 146.78. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (329) 171.50; 350-400 lbs (376) 157.12; 400-450 lbs (429) 157.92; 450-500 lbs (480) 154.06; 500-550 lbs (526) 147.01; 550-600 lbs (576) 145.42; 600-650 lbs (622) 142.43; 650-700 lbs (670) 142.45; 700-750 lbs (719) 141.70; 750-800 lbs (782) 142.53; 800-850 lbs (821) 136.77; 850-900 lbs (868) 139.41. Dairy Steers: Large 3 600-650 lbs (629) 65.27; 650-700 lbs (660) 63.93. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (331) 145.81; 350-400 lbs (378) 153.60; 400-450 lbs (426) 144.16; 450-500 lbs (474) 140.93; 500-550 lbs (522) 139.12; 550-600 lbs (575) 138.16; 600-650 lbs (626) 141.24; 650-700 lbs (673) 141.99; 700-750 lbs (720) 140.17; 750-800 lbs (768) 138.05; 800-850 lbs (820) 134.81; 850-900 lbs (878) 131.95; 900-950 lbs (919) 125.51. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (326) 136.53; 350-400 lbs (380) 135.72; 400-450 lbs (429) 134.49; 450-500 lbs (475) 132.50; 500-550 lbs (524) 132.53; 550-600 lbs (571) 129.92; 600-650 lbs (619) 130.48; 650-700 lbs (671) 132.30; 700-750 lbs (723) 132.26; 750-800 lbs (776) 123.84; 800-850 lbs (817) 123.21; 850-900 lbs (878) 120.39.

Arkansas 10,400. 25 pct over 600 lbs. 40 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (328) 168.24; 350-400 lbs (372) 160.78; 400-450 lbs (424) 153.97; 450-500 lbs (478) 154.19; 500-550 lbs (518) 146.83; 550-600 lbs (570) 141.59; 600-650 lbs (624) 139.00; 650-700 lbs (668) 129.36; 700-750 lbs (723) 135.91. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (390) 156.38; 450-500 lbs (479) 152.75; 500-550 lbs (535) 143.80; 550-600 lbs (583) 139.21; 600-650 lbs (610) 138.97; 650-700 lbs (691) 131.16; 700-750 lbs (709) 135.51. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (326) 138.68; 350-400 lbs (370) 138.74; 400-450 lbs (424) 135.76; 450-500 lbs (469) 128.44; 500-550 lbs (524) 124.48; 550-600 lbs (578) 125.02; 600-650 lbs (617) 120.63; 650-700 lbs (665) 117.60. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (354) 138.00; 400-450 lbs (436) 129.74; 450-500 lbs (477) 126.64; 500-550 lbs (532) 124.03.

 

 

 

 

 

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Friday, November 15, 2019 12:45 PM