Incoming House Ag Chairman Sees No Reason To Carry Over Farm Bill To 2019

By Chris Clayton
DTN Ag Policy Editor

Omaha (DTN) – U.S. Rep. Collin Peterson, who likely will retake the chairmanship of the House Agriculture Committee, said his top priority right now is to get a farm bill done in the upcoming lame-duck session of Congress that will start November 19.
Peterson, a Democrat from Minnesota, won his 14th term. Peterson said he got a phone call from USDA Secretary Sonny Perdue late in the evening congratulating Peterson and encouraged him to help get a farm bill done quickly.
“That’s going to be the No. 1 goal,” Peterson told reporters on a conference call. “I think we’re relatively close, and I think we can work this out and get this done before this Congress adjourns.”
As of midday November 7, Democrats had retaken the House of Representatives with a 220-194 lead in seats over Republicans. There were still 26 House races nationally in which a winner had not been declared.
President Donald Trump, in a White House news conference, was asked about the farm bill, which he said “is working really well.” But the president also complained about Democrats delaying the farm bill because “Democrats are not giving us the 10 votes we need. The democrats are not approving the farm bill with work rules.” Trump was pointing to contention over work requirements for people on Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) aid.
Peterson said he talked with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi a couple of days ago, and she indicated to him that she wants to work on a bipartisan basis to get the farm bill done, as well as work on an infrastructure package and areas such as ethics reform.
Until now, current House Ag Committee Chairman Michael Conaway, R-Texas, has been dogged by tightening work requirements in SNAP. Peterson thinks that Conaway’s stance may loosen a little bit. Peterson has maintained the problem is not tougher work and job training requirements for SNAP recipients, but restricting the ability of states to avoid current work requirements.
“The problem is not that we don’t have work requirements, the problem is we have all of these waivers,” Peterson said, noting USDA is working to tighten waiver requirements already. Peterson added, “Given what happened in this election, I don’t know what leverage they think they have not resolving this.”
At the moment, Peterson said he can’t do anything about delays in the farm bill. Senate Agriculture Committee leaders have been more responsible for delaying the bill for their negotiating stances on SNAP and commodity programs. Still, Peterson doesn’t see any way the farm bill isn’t finalized in the lame-duck session.
“I get the sense they are going to work this out,” he said.
The House bill shifts some base acre payments away from land that has not been planted in the past decade – largely affecting wheat acres converted to pasture – and uses the funds to boost payments largely to cotton acres that have been hit with persistent drought. The changes in the House bill would lead to a net benefit for cotton producers of $438 million over 10 years, but it is opposed by Senate Ag Chairman Pat Roberts, R-Kan., whose state would lose base acres as a result.
“This is an issue between the two chairmen,” Peterson said, adding he thinks the issue will be resolved.
The plan when the farm bill principal negotiators last met was to work through some language over the break, get some cost scores from the Congressional Budget Office and plan to resolve the outstanding issues when Congress returns. Peterson said neither he nor Democratic leaders want to carryover the farm bill into 2019.
“On the Democratic side of the House, there is no indication or idea that we want to delay this thing whatsoever,” he said.
The National Association of Wheat Growers called on Congress to complete the farm bill during the lame-duck session, citing the uncertainty and loss of some beneficial programs as reasons to move ahead.
“In particular, the outlook for foreign market development funding is in doubt until action is taken,” said Jimmie Musick, an Oklahoma farmer and NAWG president. “Additionally, the USDA no longer has the authority to undertake new sign-ups for the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), which incentivizes growers to incorporate healthy soil, non-tillage, and other similar practices into their operations.”
In one area Peterson pointed to concerns about the farm bill, he said he would like to have seen more acreage in the Conservation Reserve Program. The House bill moves CRP acreage to 29 million acres but lowers the rental rates to 80% of the average county rental rate. The Senate bill increases CRP acreage 1 million acres to 25 million acres, but lowers the rental rate to 88% of the county average rate. Peterson would also like to protect the Conservation Stewardship Program, which is phased out in the House bill but maintained in the Senate bill.
Zippy Duvall, president of the American Farm Bureau Federation, didn’t specifically mention the farm bill in a statement regarding the new Congress. Duvall stressed the need to “strengthen agriculture by fixing the ag labor problems we face, boosting our farm economy via export growth and reducing the burden and cost of federal regulations.
“Supporting the use of farm-grown fuels, fixing our nation’s broken infrastructure, supporting agricultural research, and bridging the broadband gap that hurts rural America are also important for a strong agriculture,” the Farm Bureau president said. “We hope that the newly elected leaders across the nation will join us in unifying behind these goals.”
The replacement trade deal for NAFTA, the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, also will come up for a vote in the new Congress. Peterson said doesn’t think the trade deal creates big gains for agriculture, but it doesn’t translate into a loss, either. He supports the new trade agreement, but he doesn’t know how House colleagues will back it.
“I have no idea. All I can tell you is I’m going to support it, and encourage my colleagues to support it,” Peterson said.
When asked about tariffs and trade, Peterson said President Trump controls what is going on with tariffs, and there is little a Democratic-held House can do to get Trump to drop steel and aluminum tariffs on some trading partners, or drop the tariffs against China that have halted agricultural trade to what was the top U.S. ag trade destination.
“He’s the president and he’s doing what he thinks is right and what he said he was going to do during the (2016) campaign,” Peterson said.
Moving into next year, Peterson said, the major work of the committee would be oversight of USDA as he pointed to some controversies with commodity checkoffs and the USDA realignment that would move the Economic Research Service and National Institute of Food and Agriculture out the Washington, D. C., area.

Quality In The Cow Herd

When you think of a “quality” cow herd, I suspect you see easy-fleshing cows with 500- to 600-pound (lb.) calves, each born unassisted in a 60-day window. A dream to handle, docile in every case, never a stray missing the gate. Calves top the market and feeders fight over who will own them every year.
That’s a pretty good picture, but let’s widen the view to a quality survey reported by McKensie Harris and others in the 2106 Market Cow Report of the National Beef Quality Audit (NBQA). It does not conjure picturesque or pastoral scenes, but there are some interesting quality trends to take in.
Market cows, the culls you sell, are a key source of lean trimmings to the beef supply chain and often represent 15% to 25% of gross income. However, the decision to sell a cow is not an active management choice in most operations. Commercial cattlemen “market” cows as a byproduct of the cow’s inability to remain productive, not because they want to increase income from cull cows.
That’s certainly different from the feeder and fed cattle scene. For one thing, those cows reflect delayed genetic trends in the herd, assuming the culls are older than average. The previous market cow NBQA was in 2007, conducted prior to the significant drought and culling across the U.S. in the next several years. The 2016 report offers insight as to how genetics within the commercial herd have changed relative to type and carcass characteristics, due to management and drought-induced culling.
Today, the percentage of Angus-type fed cattle hovers around 67%, a comparable number to the 2016 market cow report that suggests 68% of cows and 67% of bulls were Angus type. That’s a sizable increase in Angus influence, considering the 2007 report from John Nicholson and others indicated 44% of market cows and 52% of market bulls were predominately black hided—just 9 years earlier.
The genetic trend for marbling has increased for most breeds regardless of hide color. While neither market cows nor bulls are managed to express genetic potential for marbling, the 30-unit increase in average marbling score (about 1/3 of a quality grade) from 2007 to 2016 confirms the commercial cow herd has improved in quality potential. Besides that 30-unit marbling increase, distribution of marbling scores also improved, moving a greater percentage of cows toward higher scores.
While skewed toward quality, cows fit every marbling category. There were 2.8% with enough to grade Prime, between slightly abundant to abundant marbling. It’s hard to argue the Prime target is too lofty a goal for fed cattle when nearly 3% of cull market cows achieved that level of marbling for prime. Remember, they likely represented a delayed genetic trend, and the report is already two years old. Market cows cannot qualify for Prime due to advanced maturity, but today’s overall genetics and herd management signal the potential for continued increases in average quality grade. NBQA herd changes were not limited to marbling potential. Market cow carcass weights increased by 50 lb. over the 9 years, with ribeyes increased by 0.45 square inches. That’s a product of the larger carcass rather than more heavily muscled cows.
Cows can still get better, obviously: 21% of them were marketed at a light muscle score, reducing beef yield and increasing the chance of harvest lameness. The fall season offers benefits for a short-term feeding period in which cows can put on weight quickly and generally move to a more favorable marketing window. Keep in mind, feed efficiency tends to worsen with the older cows and the longer they are fed, so have a marketing plan in place.
Before entertaining a cow-feeding enterprise, check two things: 14% of the market cows in the NBQA had worn or broken teeth, which makes them poor feeding candidates. Better candidates but perhaps wrongly classified were the 17% of cows pregnant when sold. A short feeding period may not only improve cull-cow quality, but also offer a chance for one more pregnancy check before marketing. If these late-discovery bred cows don’t fit your ideal 60-day calving window, they certainly have more value for somebody as bred rather than thin, open cows.
Cull cows can serve as a good indicator, given the NBQA data, of where the beef community has improved and what challenges remain. In your herd, cull cows are a reflection of what doesn’t work in your system. Understanding how she got there offers a path to a higher quality cow herd.

Judge Halts Keystone Pipeline

By Todd Neeley
DTN Staff Reporter

Omaha (DTN) – The Keystone XL pipeline project hit yet another snag, as a federal court in Montana on November 8 overturned President Donald Trump’s administration’s approval of a permit to build the pipeline.
The U.S. District Court for the District of Montana, Great Falls division, vacated the approval and remanded it back to the U.S. Department of State for a more-thorough environmental review that could take months to complete.
The latest action is just another in a long, winding legal battle that has spanned two presidential administrations, sparked protests across the Midwest from environmentalists and landowners, and was seemingly resolved when Trump granted a presidential permit.
“It was a political decision made by the judge,” President Donald Trump said of the latest court ruling during a press gaggle ahead of an overseas trip on November 16. “I think it’s a disgrace.”
Environmental groups, farmers and ranchers fought TransCanada, the company that wants to build the pipeline, for years to stop construction of the planned 2,000-mile pipeline that would carry 830,000 barrels of bitumen oil per day from Alberta, Canada, to the Gulf of Mexico.
Opponents’ concern was the pipeline would pass through sensitive habitats across the Nebraska Sandhills, and they feared any pipeline breaches could harm the environment. Also, TransCanada planned to use eminent domain with about 2% of landowners to acquire the land needed to build the pipeline, upsetting those who potentially would be affected.
U.S. District Court Judge Brian Morris said the State Department’s analysis “fell short of a hard look” and requires a supplemental environmental study.
Morris ordered the State Department to consider the effects of current oil prices on the viability of the pipeline, the “cumulative effects” of greenhouse gas emissions from the Alberta Clipper expansion and the Keystone pipeline, as well as updated modeling of potential oil spills and recommended mitigation measures, among other issues. The Alberta Clipper is another oil pipeline owned and operated by Enbridge that runs from Hardisty, Alberta, Canada, to Superior, Wisconsin.
“The department failed to comply with NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act) and the APA (Administrative Procedures Act) when it disregarded prior factual findings related to climate change and reversed course,” Morris writes.
In addition, the court requires the State Department to consider potential adverse effects on endangered species from oil spills associated with Keystone “in light of the updated data on oil spills and leaks.”
The court ordered TransCanada to not conduct work on the pipeline in South Dakota, Montana and Nebraska.
Northern Plains Resource Council, Bold Alliance, Center for Biological Diversity, Friends of the Earth, Natural Resources Defense Council and Sierra Club filed the lawsuit in March 2017.
The Montana court on Aug. 15, 2018, ordered additional analysis of the new pipeline route through Nebraska.
Mark Hefflinger, communications director for Bold Alliance, said in a statement the decision was a victory for property rights.
“This now 10-year battle is still far from over,” he said. “We’ll continue to stand together against this tar sands export pipeline that threatens property rights, water and climate at every opportunity, at every public hearing. People on the route deserve due process.”
Trump signed an executive order on Jan. 25, 2017, clearing the way for the Keystone project. One day later, TransCanada filed a new application for a presidential permit with the State Department.
Although the State Department concluded in a study the pipeline would be safe for the environment, President Barack Obama’s administration rejected a previous application for a presidential permit. That rejection led TransCanada to file a complaint using the North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA.
Robin Rorick, vice president of midstream and industry operations for the American Petroleum Institute, said additional environmental review is unnecessary.
“In the more than 10 years since Keystone XL was proposed, the pipeline has passed every environmental review conducted for it,” Rorick said in a statement. “In fact, a total of six assessments by both the Obama and Trump administrations concluded that KXL is safe to build. Calls to conduct identical environmental reviews makes no sense and are a waste of tax dollars. A decade of Keystone delays needs to end now.”

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 41,000

Texas 20,200. 93 over 600 lbs. 38 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 650-700 lbs 153.00; 700-750 lbs 152.00; 750-800 lbs 144.00; 800-850 lbs 143.00-147.00; 850-900 lbs 144.00-149.00; Current Del 700-750 lbs 154.00; 750-800 lbs 152.93-153.25; 800-850 lbs 153.50-160.00; Dec FOB 650-700 lbs 146.60-150.00; Jan FOB 750-800 lbs 142.00; 800-850 lbs 138.40-142.95; Feb FOB 700-750 lbs 134.45-137.60; Nov-Dec Del 450-500 lbs 187.50; Jan Del 650-700 lbs 153.50; 800-850 lbs 143.95-145.20. Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB 650-700 lbs 148.56-153.43; 700-750 lbs 151.42-153.43; 750-800 lbs 145.50-149.52; 800-850 lbs 146.65; Current Del 600-650 lbs 155.00; 700-750 lbs 154.00; 750-800 lbs 141.50-154.00; 800-850 lbs 143.50-149.95; 850-900 lbs 147.50; Dec Del 600-650 lbs 157.00; 750-800 lbs 146.00-147.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 550-600 lbs 143.50-150.00; Dec FOB 700-750 lbs 142.00; Jan FOB 650-700 lbs 138.65; 700-750 lbs 134.40-142.00; Feb FOB 700-750 lbs 131.45-132.60; Jan Del 700-750 lbs 135.45-138.95; 750-800 lbs 135.95-140.20; Feb Del 700-750 lbs 134.65; 750-800 lbs 138.60; Mar Del 700-750 lbs 134.65. Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB 600-650 lbs 144.43-146.65; 650-700 lbs 140.71-147.52; 700-750 lbs 138.51; 750-800 lbs 140.65; Current Del 550-600 lbs 147.00; 650-700 lbs 140.00-152.50; 700-750 lbs 138.00-146.00; 750-800 lbs 142.95; Dec FOB 650-700 lbs 137.54; 700-750 lbs 138.40; 750-800 lbs 139.40; Nov-Dec Del 650-700 lbs 140.00.

Oklahoma 2200. 100 over 600 lbs. 27 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 650-700 lbs 154.91; 700-750 lbs 152.00-154.37; 750-800 lbs 150.98-152.01; 800-850 lbs 151.00-158.00; Current Del 700-750 lbs 154.00. Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB 800-850 lbs 149.12-149.90; Current Del 650-700 lbs 154.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 700-750 lbs 143.01; 750-800 lbs 147.27.

New Mexico 7200. 83 over 600 lbs. 37 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 750-800 lbs 150.00; Nov-Dec FOB 450-500 lbs 186.00; Jan FOB 800-850 lbs 142.95. Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB 750-800 lbs 140.98; 800-850 lbs 142.98; 850-900 lbs 145.71. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Jan FOB 750-800 lbs 134.95. Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB 700-750 lbs 143.71.

Kansas 2200. 100 over 600 lbs. 66 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 700-750 lbs 153.83; Current Del 750-800 lbs 154.00. Medium and Large 1-2 Current Del 750-800 lbs 152.80; 800-850 lbs 151.00-153.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current Del 700-750 lbs 145.00; Current Del 750-800 lbs 149.00. Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB 700-750 lbs 144.82; Feb FOB 700-750 lbs 133.65; Mar FOB 700750 lbs 133.65; Current Del 700-750 lbs 142.00.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — November 9
National feeder cattle receipts: 329,800

Steers and heifers sold steady to $5 lower. Buyers nationwide had the opportunity to see and bid on a wide range of weights, quality and flesh. The gamut was run on flesh from thin to fleshy; quality was from plain to excellent; and 300-700 lb steer and heifer calves were plentiful in the country. An established preweaning and vaccination program has become a must for producers to receive top dollar this time of year (in between Halloween and Thanksgiving. Many feedyards in the Upper Midwest and the Northern Plains have seen their fair share of snow already this year as anecdotes of central Nebraska feedyards have measured around six inches of snow mid to late week. Muddy pens are sure going to be a concern moving forward as the days get shorter, however temperatures in the teens in the midsection of the country may bring a welcomed freeze to ground conditions. Wind chills will be a concern, especially on incoming feedlot cattle, but it could be a blessing in disguise if copious amounts of precipitation can hold off for a little while longer. Negotiated cash fed cattle traded Nov. 9 steady to $1 lower with live sales at mostly $114; a few traded earlier in the day in Texas at $115. Generally, dressed sales are steady with Nov. 2 at $180. After Nov. 2 sideways movement in the CME Cattle Complex, Nov. 5 came and wiped out any idea of moving the market higher on the week. Live Cattle contracts were $1.42-1.75 lower on the day, while Feeder Cattle contracts were $2.20-3.33 lower on Nov. 5. After sideways movement the middle three days of the week, Nov. 9 saw sharp losses on the day. For the week, December 2018 through October 2019 Live Cattle contracts were $2.07-4.40 lower. The December Live Cattle contract closed Nov. 9 at $114.57; the lowest price since the middle of September. The soon to expire November Feeder Cattle contract was $3.50 lower on the week, while January 2019 through August 2019 contracts were $5.20-6.18 lower for the week.

Texas 7500. 46 pct over 600 lbs. 44 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (365) 204.23; 400-450 lbs (436) 181.31; 450-500 lbs (478) 176.12; 500-550 lbs (518) 168.52; 550-600 lbs (581) 151.59; 600-650 lbs (621) 154.76; 650-700 lbs (661) 152.59; 700-750 lbs (745) 149.57; 750-800 lbs (774) 148.13; 800-850 lbs (809) 149.93. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (417) 158.57; 450-500 lbs (485) 160.32; 500-550 lbs (517) 147.63; 550-600 lbs (584) 144.96; 600-650 lbs (612) 134.14; 650-700 lbs (660) 134.64; 700-750 lbs (726) 145.96. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (424) 158.78; 450-500 lbs (469) 147.52; 500-550 lbs (523) 138.83; 550-600 lbs (577) 134.40; 600-650 lbs (616) 140.35; 700-750 lbs (715) 139.82; 750-800 lbs (764) 137.87. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (389) 150.40; 400-450 lbs (432) 141.06; 450-500 lbs (464) 138.32; 500-550 lbs (533) 131.86; 550-600 lbs (576) 126.35; 600-650 lbs (629) 122.79; 650-700 lbs (671) 121.77; 750-800 lbs (793) 136.54.

Oklahoma 38,100. 42 pct over 600 lbs. 40 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (338) 196.69; 350-400 lbs (372) 193.02; 400-450 lbs (421) 182.88; 450-500 lbs (474) 177.44; 500-550 lbs (523) 168.72; 550-600 lbs (568) 159.53; 600-650 lbs (626) 153.51; 650-700 lbs (667) 150.76; 700-750 lbs (725) 151.52; 750-800 lbs (773) 149.32; 800-850 lbs (824) 151.78; 850-900 lbs (874) 152.88; 900-950 lbs (908) 141.61; 950-1000 lbs (979) 144.96. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (326) 189.81; 350-400 lbs (371) 184.30; 400-450 lbs (428) 176.58; 450-500 lbs (468) 171.12; 500-550 lbs (527) 163.36; 550-600 lbs (580) 152.76; 600-650 lbs (620) 147.98; 650-700 lbs (680) 143.09; 700-750 lbs (730) 141.53; 750-800 lbs (764) 145.66; 800-850 lbs (828) 146.53; 850-900 lbs (870) 143.05; 1000-1050 lbs (1013) 137.23. Holstein Steers: Large 3 part load 557 lbs 67.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (329) 163.51; 350-400 lbs (380) 157.78; 400-450 lbs (423) 153.21; 450-500 lbs (473) 146.15; 500-550 lbs (526) 141.82; 550-600 lbs (576) 139.66; 600-650 lbs (629) 141.76; 650-700 lbs (677) 143.38; 700-750 lbs (723) 143.53; 750-800 lbs (760) 145.36; 800-850 lbs (828) 133.58; 850-900 lbs (858) 136.42; 950-1000 lbs (966) 126.36. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (317) 151.32; 350-400 lbs (384) 150.08; 400-450 lbs (424) 147.32; 450-500 lbs (481) 143.11; 500-550 lbs (524) 137.93; 550-600 lbs (576) 134.51; 600-650 lbs (624) 134.36; 650-700 lbs (675) 136.74; 700-750 lbs (711) 140.62; 750-800 lbs (773) 138.75; 800-850 lbs (826) 130.66.

New Mexico 10,200. 31 pct over 600 lbs. 44 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 250-300 lbs (268) 198.76; 300-350 lbs (323) 209.45; 350-400 lbs (365) 205.49; 400-450 lbs (426) 186.76; 450-500 lbs (476) 173.01; 500-550 lbs (525) 163.53; 550-600 lbs (583) 152.88; 600-650 lbs (616) 153.86; 750-800 lbs (759) 145.39. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (374) 187.96; 400-450 lbs (429) 174.00; 450-500 lbs (476) 165.26; 500-550 lbs (532) 154.46; 550-600 lbs (574) 148.93. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (317) 172.88; 350-400 lbs (368) 164.13; 400-450 lbs (417) 161.88; 450-500 lbs (478) 153.58; 500-550 lbs (529) 140.68; 550-600 lbs (577) 133.88. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (431) 145.66; 450-500 lbs (477) 139.69; 500-550 lbs (527) 126.38; 550-600 lbs (569) 133.67; 600-650 lbs (622) 130.53.

Kansas 16,200. 58 pct over 600 lbs. 37 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (383) 217.70; 400-450 lbs (416) 197.57; 450-500 lbs (478) 180.45; 500-550 lbs (530) 164.74; 550-600 lbs (580) 163.64; 600-650 lbs (625) 151.66; 650-700 lbs (673) 155.22; 700-750 lbs (722) 157.42; 750-800 lbs (775) 151.29; 800-850 lbs (812) 156.61; 850-900 lbs (882) 151.43; 900-950 lbs (907) 151.54; few loads 970 lbs 144.00; 1000-1050 lbs (1034) 138.38. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (441) 182.96; 450-500 lbs (485) 165.65; 500-550 lbs (537) 156.98; 550-600 lbs (574) 152.12; 600-650 lbs (621) 148.81; 650-700 lbs (675) 146.52; 700-750 lbs (716) 144.18; 750-800 lbs (772) 140.87; 800-850 lbs (821) 143.30; 850-900 lbs (882) 142.87. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (380) 186.91; 400-450 lbs (430) 161.56; 450-500 lbs (470) 162.73; 500-550 lbs (526) 153.56; 550-600 lbs (572) 146.04; 600-650 lbs (627) 143.23; 650-700 lbs (671) 139.44; 700-750 lbs (725) 140.87; 750-800 lbs (797) 136.93; 800-850 lbs (826) 139.87; 850-900 lbs (881) 132.79; 950-1000 lbs (990) 125.66. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (427) 160.46; 450-500 lbs (476) 149.86; 500-550 lbs (527) 143.59; 550-600 lbs (570) 140.03; 600-650 lbs (638) 137.53; 650-700 lbs (668) 133.39; 700-750 lbs (723) 135.42; 800-850 lbs (831) 133.10.

Missouri 32,500. 44 pct over 600 lbs. 43 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (326) 179.50; 350-400 lbs (376) 177.83; 400-450 lbs (424) 176.05; 450-500 lbs (476) 169.97; 500-550 lbs (530) 164.97; 550-600 lbs (572) 159.24; 600-650 lbs (623) 156.10; 650-700 lbs (675) 157.17; 700-750 lbs (727) 156.87; 750-800 lbs (779) 157.25; 800-850 lbs (825) 155.60; 850-900 lbs (873) 142.95; 900-950 lbs (923) 142.78. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (335) 156.78; 350-400 lbs (384) 171.76; 400-450 lbs (429) 161.85; 450-500 lbs (478) 156.47; 500-550 lbs (524) 154.26; 550-600 lbs (574) 149.72; 600-650 lbs (622) 147.46; 650-700 lbs (681) 146.66; 700-750 lbs (719) 151.54; 750-800 lbs (766) 139.14; 800-850 lbs (834) 150.90; 850-900 lbs (876) 139.70; part load 942 lbs 145.50. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (335) 145.67; 350-400 lbs (379) 152.51; 400-450 lbs (425) 149.57; 450-500 lbs (473) 143.39; 500-550 lbs (526) 140.03; 550-600 lbs (576) 139.98; 600-650 lbs (631) 146.39; 650-700 lbs (671) 144.82; 700-750 lbs (719) 146.01; 750-800 lbs (762) 140.59; 800-850 lbs (813) 132.11; 850-900 lbs (863) 127.91. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (333) 141.59; 350-400 lbs (373) 140.58; 400-450 lbs (428) 138.32; 450-500 lbs (476) 136.11; 500-550 lbs (526) 133.91; 550-600 lbs (571) 131.01; 600-650 lbs (623) 134.90; 650-700 lbs (671) 141.45; 700-750 lbs (729) 141.00; 750-800 lbs (774) 131.17; 800-850 lbs (839) 139.82.

Arkansas 6200. 19 pct over 600 lbs. 44 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (327) 187.08; 350-400 lbs (372) 176.92; 400-450 lbs (426) 175.01; 450-500 lbs (472) 165.66; 500-550 lbs (520) 156.59; 550-600 lbs (576) 149.57; 600-650 lbs (626) 148.90; 650-700 lbs (661) 142.87. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (326) 144.04; 350-400 lbs (378) 141.70; 400-450 lbs (423) 139.91; 450-500 lbs (469) 136.54; 500-550 lbs (526) 131.59; 550-600 lbs (570) 128.49; 600-650 lbs (621) 130.78; 650-700 lbs (663) 126.15.

 

 

 

 

 

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Friday, November 16, 2018 11:29 AM