Wheat Acres Set To Slip Again As Farmers Eye Depressed Market

By Emily Unglesbee
DTN Staff Reporter

Rockville, Md. (DTN) – After several days of rainfall, Kansas wheat farmer Rick Horton was spending the morning in his truck, hunting for fields dry enough to drill wheat. The time was right, but the weather was not cooperating.
A nagging question hangs over Horton and other wheat farmers this fall: Should they bother?
“It’s tough to keep gambling on planting corn-on-corn or milo-to-milo in western Kansas,” said Horton, whose family farms and runs Horton Seed Services near Leoti, Kansas. “Wheat has always kind of been the safe bet. But recently, it isn’t.”
With wheat futures hovering in the mid-$4 range and cash prices closer to $3, wheat growers face a dilemma this fall. Wheat is unlikely to make a profit, but prices for corn, soybeans and sorghum – the obvious alternatives – are also depressed.
“It’s kind of a dumpster fire right now, and the wheat one is burning the hottest,” said David Widmar, an agricultural economist with a group called Agricultural Economic Insights, as well as a researcher with the Center for Commercial Agriculture at Purdue University. “The last few years have been a search for the least bad alternative.”
Both Widmar and Horton agree that wheat acres are likely to slip again in the 2017-18 crop year. By how much and with what impact remain important questions.
THE CASE AGAINST WHEAT
From a simple yield perspective, corn, soybeans and sorghum have the potential to be more profitable alternatives than wheat. But in the semi-arid Great Plains, the residue that wheat stubble provides keeps erosion at bay, and the drought-hardy wheat plant remains a key rotational crop for growers there.
“We’re wheat country,” Horton said. “We’re always going to plant some wheat.”
But a global glut of wheat and improved genetics in crops like corn, which allows them to be farmed with less water, have shaken up crop rotations and crop budgets in the Great Plains region for years, Widmar noted.
“One thing we watch closely is these nationwide crop budgets, and it’s clear that wheat has just been the hardest hit of the traditional commodities during this downturn,” he said.
Horton is a passionate and dedicated wheat grower. His family routinely pushes wheat yields to impressive heights, and last year he won first place in the dryland winter wheat category of the National Wheat Yield Contest.
Yet even his operation trimmed its wheat acreage last year and is likely to do so again this year, he said.
“We’re down a little bit more than last year, due to the fact that we planted corn back into some milo and corn stalks, where we normally would have been fallow going to wheat. So to bring wheat acres back up, we’d have to plant wheat into just-cut corn or go continuous wheat – and right now the market is telling us not to do that,” Horton said.
In times of slipping revenues and multiple years in the red, crop insurance coverage also becomes an important part of wheat planting decisions, Horton and Widmar noted.
USDA recently announced that U.S. farmers will receive $8 billion from 2016 crop insurance programs. Some of those payments are for disasters like hurricanes, wildfires and drought, but many were triggered by low commodity prices and shrinking farm revenues.
“If you just sit down and look at your APH [Actual Production History], lock in your insurance price on a row crop next year, and look at wheat strictly from an insurance perspective – which I don’t – row crops [like corn and soybeans] have at least a $110-per-acre advantage over wheat,” Horton estimated.
2018 ACREAGE
Wheat farmers will head into 2018 at the bottom of a three-decades-long slide in U.S. wheat acres.
“It’s not unusual to see ups and downs in wheat acreage,” Widmar said. “But what is unusual is this long, sustained downward trend. What makes it unique is we’ve been losing about 800,000 wheat acres a year, for about 35 years.”
The slide became a cliff in the past two years, when U.S. farmers pulled wheat off nearly 9 million acres between 2015 and 2017. This year’s planted wheat acreage of 46 million acres is the lowest in recorded U.S. history.
If Horton Seed Services’ experience is any indicator, acres in 2018 will almost certainly be even lower, Horton said.
The company, which sells, treats and cleans certified wheat seed, covers much of western Kansas, Horton said. Wheat seed sales aren’t final for the year yet, but their seed cleaning numbers have been telling, Horton said. Last year, they cleaned 9% fewer bushels of seed, and this year, they’ve cleaned 13% fewer bushels.
“There’s no question wheat acres in western Kansas, at least, are going down again this year,” he said.
Widmar concurred, but added that huge drops like those between 2015 and 2017 – when wheat lost more than 4 million acres each year – are unlikely.
“It’s a little difficult to imagine another 4-plus-million-acre adjustment in wheat acres, especially to the downside,” he said.
Why? The alternative crops of corn and soybeans simply aren’t that attractive, in part because their acres have swelled as wheat has declined.
“If you’re dumping nearly 9 million acres of wheat, those acres are going somewhere; farmers didn’t idle them,” Widmar said. “We pushed those and then some into corn and soybeans. So in some ways, we’ve been pushing some problems straight into another one.”
To add to the over-production problem, 13 million acres have left the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) since 2007, most heavily from states like Montana, North Dakota, Texas and Kansas.
Currently, the CRP cap sits at 24 million acres, an all-time low in the program’s 30-year history. As Congress takes on the 2018 farm bill, it will face important questions about whether to increase, maintain or lower that cap, Widmar pointed out.
“All those millions of acres have gone into production and these are areas that traditionally raise wheat,” Widmar said. “So we’re finding this struggle: We’ve increased production in the U.S. and globally when times are good; now how do we ratchet down?”

Group Alleges Violations In Complaint Against Oklahoma Beef Council

By Todd Neeley
DTN Staff Reporter

Omaha (DTN) – A group funded by the Humane Society of the United States has asked the USDA to launch an investigation into efforts in Oklahoma to establish a statewide beef checkoff program, according to a complaint filed on Oct. 3.
The Organization for Competitive Markets, which has pressed the USDA to take steps to better control federal checkoff programs as a whole, called on the agency to audit the checkoff in Oklahoma.
The OCM alleges the Oklahoma Beef Council has illegally become involved with the Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Association in promoting a “yes” vote on a proposed $1 state checkoff program by using the federal checkoff logo, http://bit.ly/2yuxqR7, on a website and Facebook page, http://bit.ly/2xZFNAQ. The proposed Oklahoma checkoff is set for a Nov. 1 vote.
The Oklahoma Beef Council said in a statement it is “not involved nor has it funded the Vote Yes beef checkoff referendum process in Oklahoma led by a coalition of Oklahoma beef and agriculture organizations.”
In addition, OCM requested a complete audit in light of a recent $2.6 million theft from the federal program by a former employee who pled guilty on a variety of charges.
In the complaint the OCM alleges the Oklahoma Beef Council’s involvement in promoting the state checkoff vote is in violation of Beef Promotion and Research Act of 1985 and a federal order that governs the program.
OCM contends the act and the order “explicitly ban the beef council from influencing governmental action or policy. Supporting and promoting an increase in fees by the beef council is clearly a violation of this explicit prohibition,” the complaint said.
“Further, the council and the national beef checkoff’s funds and trademarked logo, mark and symbol are illegally being used to promote and influence government policy and action by supporting and promoting a ‘yes’ vote on the referendum to establish a state of Oklahoma beef checkoff program which will assess every Oklahoma cattle producer an additional $1 per-head fee,” according to the complaint.
“Compounding this illegal use of Beef Research and Promotion checkoff funds and trademark is the fact that the council has just recently disclosed that over $2.6 million of federally mandated beef checkoff fees have been stolen,” the complaint said.
“From their gross negligence of accountability for federal tax dollars and the accountability they owe to every Oklahoma family farmer and rancher who is mandated to pay these fees, it is absolutely clear the council does not have the accounting procedures in place or the sophistication and expertise to provide an accurate accounting of the funds they are currently entrusted.”
The Oklahoma Beef Council acknowledged the theft and addressed the concerns about the upcoming vote.
In July 2016 the council said it discovered one of its employees, Melissa Morton, “had committed fraud against OBC and its board of directors, employees, and constituents,” the council said in a statement, noting it continues to work to recover lost funds.
Morton has pled guilty to fraud and is awaiting sentencing in federal court after falsifying financial documents, according to the council.
“The beef producers of this state put their trust in OBC, and we take this trust extremely seriously,” the council said. “We have already taken steps to ensure the integrity of the beef checkoff in Oklahoma and a greater level of accountability generally.”
If Oklahoma producers vote for the checkoff, it would become the 16th state to implement a $1 checkoff including Alabama, Georgia, Iowa, Idaho, Illinois, Kentucky, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah and Washington.
The federal program requires 50 cents of every $1 collected to be sent to the Cattlemen’s Beef Promotion and Research Board for programs. The $1 Oklahoma assessment would be managed by state producers and would be refundable.
Read the OCM complaint here: http://bit.ly/2hQuQOf.

Winds, Floods And Fire: U.S. Ties Record For Costly Weather

Washington (AP) – Howling winds, deadly floods, fire and ice so far this year have pushed the U.S. into a tie for weather disasters that topped in $1 billion in damages.
There have been 15 costly disasters through September, tying 2011 for the most billion-dollar weather disasters for the first nine months of a year. The record for a year is 16, and the hurricane season is not over yet.
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released the figures Oct. 6 that include three hurricanes, three tornado outbreaks, four severe storms, two floods, a drought, a freeze and wildfires.
NOAA climate scientist Adam Smith said 2017 is shaping up to be an unprecedented year. It is likely to tie or break the record for the most number of billion-dollar weather disasters set in 2005, the year of Hurricane Katrina and other deadly storms.
NOAA hasn’t calculated the costs from hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, but an outside disaster risk company estimates the U.S. damage from the three hurricanes to be around $150 billion. The remaining disasters so far this year have cost more than $21.7 billion and killed 282 people, according to NOAA.
Damage figures are adjusted for inflation; records for billion-dollar disasters go back to 1980.
Between 1980 and 2007, the U.S. averaged only four billion-dollar disasters per year. In the decade since, the country has averaged 11 per year.
Experts blame a combination of factors.
“Climate change is impacting extreme weather in ways we hadn’t anticipated,” Michael Mann of Pennsylvania State University said in an email.
But an even bigger factor is that more people moving into harm’s way “has created massive amounts of exposure in regions prone to severe weather events,” said Mark Bove, a meteorologist at insurance giant Munich Re.

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 32,300

Texas 17,300. 96 pct over 600 lbs. 45 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 685 lbs 164.57; 705-730 lbs 157.15; 750-785 lbs 154.55; 800-825 lbs 150.63; Nov 775 lbs 155.30; Dec 750-775 lbs 151.87; Jan 750-775 lbs 146.78; Del Current 525 lbs 188.35; 560 lbs 170.00; 630-640 lbs 173.80; 675 lbs 153.00; 700-725 lbs 160.41; 760-785 lbs 157.36; 800-845 lbs 154.55; Feb 800 lbs 141.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 575 lbs 158.27; 620 lbs 155.36; 650-675 lbs 152.24; 725 lbs 146.24; 750-795 lbs 148.58; 800-850 lbs 143.65; 925 lbs 138.45; Oct-Nov 775 lbs 149.37; Nov 675 lbs 148.57; 725 lbs 146.40; Dec 750 lbs 144.96; Feb 825 lbs 135.12; Del Current 625-635 lbs 162.04; 650 lbs 168.00; 725 lbs 157.00; 770-775 lbs 148.33; 800-835 lbs 148.65. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 675 lbs 147.50; 720 lbs 145.00; 750 lbs 146.00; Dec 700 lbs 145.25; Jan 700-725 lbs 145.56; 750 lbs 139.45; Feb 650 lbs 143.50; 700 lbs 137.75; Del Current 525-530 lbs 165.25; 575 lbs 162.75; 700 lbs 151.00; 750 lbs 144.00; Nov 610 lbs 162.25; Dec 725 lbs 147.00; Jan 700-725 lbs 145.93; Feb 750 lbs 139.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 600 lbs 152.39; 710-715 lbs 145.09; Nov 625 lbs 133.88; 725 lbs 143.81; Del Current 600 lbs 152.60; 750 lbs 142.00.

Oklahoma 2200. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 50 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current 700 lbs 159.32. Medium and Large 1-2 current 775 lbs 154.00; 800-825 lbs 152.25; 850-880 lbs 150.02. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 current 700 lbs 148.00; Jan 700-725 lbs 144.22. Medium and Large 1-2 Jan 700 lbs 142.95.

New Mexico 300. 100 pct over 600 lbs. No heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current 700-725 lbs 164.40; 800 lbs 151.00.

Kansas 2600. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 10 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 760-785 lbs 155.40; 800 lbs 150.59; 850 lbs 149.00; Feb 800 lbs 139.00. Medium and Large 1-2 Del Current 620 lbs 160.00; 660 lbs 153.42; 790 lbs 152.50; 800 lbs 152.00; Nov 675 lbs 152.00; 725 lbs 150.00; Dec 750 lbs 148.50; Feb 825 lbs 137.62. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 775 lbs 145.00; Feb 750 lbs 137.00.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — October 13
National feeder cattle receipts: 254,500

Steers and heifers sold mostly steady to $5 higher, with a few outlying sales nationwide calling sales from $8-10 higher on the topside. Demand for weaned calves and yearlings this time of year is always good to very good and this year is no exception. Market activity called active to very active in many locations. Feedyards are looking to take the least health risks on cattle this time of year as temperature swings in one week can range 50 degrees plus and wreak havoc on compromised immune systems. The steep unweaned calf discounts haven’t reared their ugly head yet, however when November gets here the disparity in price will be noticeable. Compared to last week, fed cattle sold $2 higher in the Southern Plains at $111 while the Northern Plains dressed trade sold $1-3 higher at $175. Cattle feeders were hoping that fed cattle trade on Oct. 12 would support the futures and bring back some stability to the cattle complex. October Live Cattle futures closed $1.42 lower on Oct. 12 but did bounce back on Oct. 13 with an incremental gain of $0.47. October Live Cattle closed the week at $112.82, $1.40 higher than Oct. 6, while the November Feeder Cattle contract closed at $155, $0.50 lower than Oct. 6. Yearling prices were at a premium in Valentine, NE on Oct. 12 a load of 762 lb steers with all the bells and whistles sold for $181. The yearling special there also boasted a load of 708 lb heifer calves at $167 or just shy $1,200/head. Those ladies will no doubt go into the replacement pen of a rancher that has plenty of yellow gold in the bin. Corn basis continues to be the talk in the Northern Plains and along the Ohio and Mississippi River basins. Barge traffic has slowed with the lower river levels and grain companies are trying to slow the influx of grain into their facilities by increasing basis levels. Chart watchers have to adjust their axis on those graphs to get the most up to date data points plotted. On Oct. 12’s Crop Production report, corn production is forecast at 14.3 billion bushels, down 6 percent from last year but up 1 percent from the September forecast. Based on conditions as of October 1, yields are expected to average 171.8 bushels per acre, up 1.9 bushels from the September forecast but down 2.8 bushels from 2016. If realized, this will be the second highest yield and production on record for the United States. Soybean production is forecast at a record 4.43 billion bushels, down slightly from September, but up 3 percent from last year. Based on October 1 conditions, yields are expected to average 49.5 bushels per acre, down 0.4 bushel from last month and down 2.5 bushels from last year.

Texas 9600. 62 pct over 600 lbs. 41 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 450-500 lbs (475) 173.15; 500-550 lbs (535) 162.58; 550-600 lbs (582) 156.37; 700-750 lbs (742) 158.51; 750-800 lbs (766) 155.86; 800-850 lbs (838) 155.01; 850-900 lbs (856) 153.68; 900-950 lbs (938) 145.62. Medium and Large 1-2 450-500 lbs (486) 158.95; 500-550 lbs (520) 156.22; 550-600 lbs (581) 150.64; 650-700 lbs (681) 149.12; 750-800 lbs (766) 141.23; 800-850 lbs (817) 146.72; part load 872 lbs 140.50. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (342) 186.75; 400-450 lbs (437) 160.15; 450-500 lbs (471) 152.99; 500-550 lbs (528) 145.42; 550-600 lbs (572) 144.45; 600-650 lbs (622) 148.28; 650-700 lbs (693) 150.11; 700-750 lbs (736) 146.25; 750-800 lbs (764) 143.44; 800-850 lbs (819) 136.91. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (427) 155.38; 450-500 lbs (463) 140.79; 550-600 lbs (581) 135.66; 750-800 lbs (757) 136.21.

Oklahoma 25,300. 52 pct over 600 lbs. 40 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 250-300 lbs (281) 215.16; 300-350 lbs (319) 196.36; 350-400 lbs (381) 195.08; 400-450 lbs (424) 177.05; 450-500 lbs (481) 169.39; 500-550 lbs (528) 159.79; 550-600 lbs (568) 157.20; 600-650 lbs (623) 156.23; 650-700 lbs (673) 156.58; 700-750 lbs (721) 161.61; 750-800 lbs (781) 156.89; 800-850 lbs (825) 156.24; 850-900 lbs (873) 150.27; 900-950 lbs (909) 148.12; 950-1000 lbs (968) 147.67; 1000-1050 lbs (1029) 131.24; few loads 1068 lbs 142.00. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (328) 183.23; 350-400 lbs (386) 180.11; 400-450 lbs (436) 172.78; 450-500 lbs (477) 160.85; 500-550 lbs (534) 156.15; 550-600 lbs (583) 153.32; 600-650 lbs (627) 145.21; 650-700 lbs (664) 153.70; 700-750 lbs (729) 152.22; 750-800 lbs (786) 153.48; 800-850 lbs (836) 149.35; 850-900 lbs (858) 146.01; part load 944 lbs 143.25. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (324) 164.73; 350-400 lbs (376) 157.19; 400-450 lbs (427) 154.25; 450-500 lbs (478) 151.76; 500-550 lbs (522) 144.91; 550-600 lbs (567) 145.00; 600-650 lbs (621) 147.36; 650-700 lbs (675) 150.98; 700-750 lbs (725) 149.25; 750-800 lbs (767) 144.29; 800-850 lbs (825) 141.20; 850-900 lbs (888) 137.88; few loads 948 lbs 136.75; 950-1000 lbs (983) 124.97. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (377) 149.01; 400-450 lbs (431) 150.70; 450-500 lbs (473) 148.35; 500-550 lbs (527) 136.84; 550-600 lbs (571) 139.10; 600-650 lbs (634) 138.27; 650-700 lbs (673) 143.04; 700-750 lbs (715) 133.56; 750-800 lbs (773) 140.76; 800-850 lbs (812) 137.73.

New Mexico 5200. 48 pct over 600 lbs. 40 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (434) 184.94; 450-500 lbs (479) 168.25; 500-550 lbs (525) 165.85; 550-600 lbs (568) 156.42; 750-800 lbs (775) 152.82; 800-850 lbs (814) 149.10. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (439) 172.03; 450-500 lbs (476) 167.72; 500-550 lbs (518) 157.79; 550-600 lbs (574) 150.86; 600-650 lbs (610) 136.71; 650-700 lbs (690) 134.56; 700-750 lbs (737) 144.94; 800-850 lbs (822) 143.98. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (428) 164.62; 450-500 lbs (472) 163.11; 500-550 lbs (532) 150.30; 550-600 lbs (571) 138.75. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (440) 150.94; 450-500 lbs (465) 149.46; 500-550 lbs (528) 147.39; 550-600 lbs (572) 136.53; 700-750 lbs (734) 121.59.

Kansas 9300. 71 pct over 600 lbs. 35 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (380) 199.36; 400-450 lbs (432) 197.00; 450-500 lbs (477) 183.56; 500-550 lbs (524) 174.04; 550-600 lbs (574) 171.87; 650-700 lbs (681) 163.06; 700-750 lbs (728) 165.68; 750-800 lbs (776) 161.73; 800-850 lbs (829) 164.19; 850-900 lbs (871) 160.99; 900-950 lbs (919) 155.73; 950-1000 lbs (978) 146.14. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (426) 180.04; 450-500 lbs (464) 172.48; 500-550 lbs (524) 163.64; 550-600 lbs (575) 164.01; 600-650 lbs (623) 162.50; 650-700 lbs (672) 156.53; 700-750 lbs (707) 156.93; 750-800 lbs (784) 155.29; 800-850 lbs (828) 154.30; 850-900 lbs (887) 150.19; 900-950 lbs (916) 145.53. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (330) 183.36; 350-400 lbs (387) 172.02; 400-450 lbs (420) 174.62; 450-500 lbs (470) 159.14; 500-550 lbs (521) 158.58; 550-600 lbs (567) 155.22; 600-650 lbs (625) 155.45; 650-700 lbs (668) 146.32; 700-750 lbs (720) 146.24; 750-800 lbs (770) 147.29; 800-850 lbs (827) 142.42; 850-900 lbs (883) 139.69. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (441) 167.10; 450-500 lbs (484) 147.21; 500-550 lbs (519) 149.53; 550-600 lbs (580) 144.57; 600-650 lbs (621) 147.19; 650-700 lbs (666) 142.34; 700-750 lbs (715) 139.56; 750-800 lbs (776) 141.83.

Missouri 26,500. 42 pct over 600 lbs. 42 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (329) 186.91; 350-400 lbs (372) 180.46; 400-450 lbs (427) 177.86; 450-500 lbs (475) 172.55; 500-550 lbs (526) 166.88; 550-600 lbs (570) 161.05; 600-650 lbs (620) 161.14; 650-700 lbs (671) 160.92; 700-750 lbs (728) 158.22; 750-800 lbs (770) 157.05; 800-850 lbs (825) 158.32; 850-900 lbs (884) 157.86; 900-950 lbs (927) 151.17; 950-1000 lbs (962) 147.41. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (327) 171.18; 350-400 lbs (372) 168.71; 400-450 lbs (427) 162.93; 450-500 lbs (477) 158.57; 500-550 lbs (529) 154.94; 550-600 lbs (576) 150.13; 600-650 lbs (625) 152.00; 650-700 lbs (674) 151.34; 700-750 lbs (721) 154.83; 750-800 lbs (767) 147.27; 850-900 lbs (872) 143.28; Holstein Steers: Large 3 450-500 lbs (470) 103.44; 500-550 lbs (528) 98.74; 550-600 lbs (575) 93.01; 700-750 lbs (727) 90.68; 850-900 lbs (881) 83.70; 950-1000 lbs (968) 81.82; part load 1026 lbs 87.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (326) 161.41; 350-400 lbs (373) 158.36; 400-450 lbs (427) 153.04; 450-500 lbs (476) 150.61; 500-550 lbs (523) 147.30; 550-600 lbs (572) 148.65; 600-650 lbs (625) 148.68; 650-700 lbs (674) 151.54; 700-750 lbs (718) 144.17; 750-800 lbs (773) 141.89; 800-850 lbs (822) 142.86; 850-900 lbs (883) 129.03. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (326) 149.12; 350-400 lbs (375) 149.96; 400-450 lbs (427) 143.15; 450-500 lbs (478) 141.23; 500-550 lbs (524) 139.57; 550-600 lbs (570) 138.02; 600-650 lbs (624) 139.64; 650-700 lbs (668) 138.70; 700-750 lbs (724) 139.40; 750-800 lbs (776) 144.41; 800-850 lbs (820) 137.19; 850-900 lbs (873) 132.81.

Arkansas 6500. 21 pct over 600 lbs. 39 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (324) 183.98; 350-400 lbs (371) 175.50; 400-450 lbs (424) 165.48; 450-500 lbs (470) 159.77; 500-550 lbs (521) 150.88; 550-600 lbs (571) 144.71; 600-650 lbs (623) 143.23; 650-700 lbs (671) 140.33. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (323) 154.40; 350-400 lbs (372) 148.62; 400-450 lbs (425) 142.66; 450-500 lbs (473) 138.00; 500-550 lbs (522) 132.97; 550-600 lbs (571) 129.56; 600-650 lbs (626) 127.46; 650-700 lbs (673) 127.34.

 

 

 

 

 

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Thursday, October 19, 2017 2:54 PM