Ag Secretary Sees Promise In Trade Moves, But Says Farmers Still Face Tariff Challenges

By Chris Clayton
DTN Ag Policy Editor

Chicago (DTN) – Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue told farmers attending a keynote session of the DTN Ag Summit that he is optimistic coming out of President Donald Trump’s G-20 talks with Chinese President Xi Jinping, as well as the signing of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) Nov. 30. But he also acknowledged that significant retaliatory tariffs by Canada, China and Mexico remain in place against U.S. agricultural products.
“From my perspective, nothing has changed from the tariff damage that farmers experience,’’ Perdue said.
Perdue led off the 12th annual DTN Ag Summit in Chicago, which this year is focusing on the theme “The Power of Actionable Insights.” Perdue is the first U.S. Agriculture Secretary to address DTN’s farmer-driven conference.
Looking at the second round of trade-aid payments under the Market Facilitation Program, Perdue told farmers USDA is still analyzing the harm from trade retaliation and working with the White House Office of Management and Budget. Perdue said he expects an announcement on a second round of payments will happen “very soon, in a few days.”
When it comes to dealing with China, Perdue noted China has made promises in the past it has failed to keep, including assurances more than a year ago to increase imports of U.S. agricultural products. So the secretary was somewhat skeptical, adding, “It’s all about the delivery of those commitments and those promises.”
Still, Perdue maintained that China will likely have to be back in the U.S. soybean market around the first of the year because of its need for oilseeds. China will have drained Brazil of old-crop soybeans, and Perdue said USDA analysts think China will have to buy from the U.S. before Brazil’s new crop is ready to export.
“We’re waiting to flesh that out and determine exactly what numbers and see the ships loading,” Perdue said.
Perdue later told reporters: “Based on worldwide supply and demand, they have pretty much expended the Brazilian crop, and we don’t think there’s enough soybean supply in South America to tide them over until the new crop in South America. So we think they have got to come back into the United States market, and this announcement in Argentina will facilitate that more quickly.”
U.S. soybeans have faced 25% retaliatory tariffs since last summer that have largely halted exports to China, leaving farmers and grain elevators to store more soybeans that are typically railed or shipped directly to export.
Under an agreement reached during the G-20 talks, President Trump would hold China accountable after the next 90 days to see if China’s commitments address the structural reforms on intellectual property theft, cyber theft and other market issues that the U.S. wants China to change. Perdue said the ball is in China’s court.
“It makes us excited about the potential, because we’re all anxious about that,” Perdue said, adding Trump and Xi have a good personal relationship, but the devil of policy is in the details.
The agreement leaves 10% tariffs on $200 billion that President Trump already has in place, as well as 25% tariffs on the initial $50 billion in products that the White House put in place.
One of the reasons China imposed tariffs on agricultural products was the trade surplus the U.S. carries in agriculture, Perdue noted. President Trump has been focused on the trade deficit with China since he took office, Perdue said.
“I’m excited about the promising news... I’m trusting, but I want to verify what’s happening in that range, and that would be more to come later,” Perdue said.
On a press call earlier, Larry Kudlow, the White House economic adviser, was asked about China dropping tariffs on U.S. agricultural products. Kudlow said he does not have any specific details yet, but added, “My expectation is that China will roll back those tariffs quickly.”
Perdue also indicated that the trade conflict with China has shown that U.S. farmers may have put too many eggs in one basket when it comes to selling large volumes of commodities to China.
“While we enjoy the market share, has China become dependent on us or have we become dependent on China?” Perdue said. “All you business people here know when you get over a certain percentage – 50% or 60% of your business – going to one customer then that’s not a healthy economic balance.” He added, “I’d rather have a lot of smaller markets rather than one huge market as we saw with China.”
Perdue pointed to some smaller export victories in agriculture that USDA has worked on, but he also said it is critical to start talks with Japan to improve U.S. exports there as well.
The China talks overtook the signing of the new U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement, which Perdue said is better for farmers than the old North American Free Trade Agreement. Perdue said Congress needs to be made aware that the new trade deal is better and approve it. He cited improvements on wheat grading in Canada, well as improved dairy and poultry access in Canada as well.
“Every aspect of that, maybe except for one in fresh fruits and vegetables, is an improved product over what we have,” Perdue said. “Our farmers are going to be better off under this USMCA deal than the old NAFTA.”
Still, the U.S. has Section 232 tariffs on Canadian and Mexican steel and aluminum. That has led to retaliatory tariffs on some U.S. agricultural products from those countries as well. Perdue said the Trump administration is looking at volume quotas for steel and aluminum that would protect domestic production of those products but allow the U.S. to drop the tariffs.
Perdue reiterated he would like to see a quota system that does not encourage retaliatory tariffs. There’s no real time frame, though, on any decisions, he said.
“We need for those retaliatory tariffs to come off if the president wants to go to a steel-and-aluminum quota system on that,” Perdue said. “That’s what many of us in the administration and cabinet favor.”
On the farm bill, Perdue noted the legislation will be delayed because of memorial services for former President George H.W. Bush, who died Nov. 30. Perdue said the farm bill will be good for young and beginning farmers with higher loan limits and loan guarantees. The bill also protects crop insurance and provides more flexibility on the Agricultural Risk Coverage (ARC) and Price Loss Coverage (PLC) programs, he said.
“We’re hopeful it will give us the flexibility for farmers to move back and forth a time or two to make the choice in what’s in their own best agricultural interest and economic interests on their own farms,” Perdue said.
While he supports getting a farm bill done, Perdue said he has been vocal about wanting to reduce the state waivers used that have allowed able-bodied adults without dependents to remain on food aid even in an economy with low unemployment. Perdue also said he is not satisfied with the forestry changes in the farm bill, but senators and environmentalists have balked at proposals advocated by the Trump administration.

Tariff Tensions Shadow U.S., Canada, Mexico Trade Pact Signing

Buenos Aires, Argentina (AP) – President Donald Trump signed a revised North American trade pact with the leaders of Canada and Mexico Nov. 30, declaring the deal a major victory for workers. But tensions over tariffs, looming GM layoffs and questions about the pact’s prospects in Congress clouded the celebratory moment.
The U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement is meant to replace the 24-year-old North American Free Trade Agreement, which Trump has long denigrated as a “disaster.” The leaders signed the new deal on the sidelines of the Group of 20 summit in Buenos Aires after two years of frequently blistering negotiations. Each country’s legislature still must approve.
“This has been a battle, and battles sometimes make great friendships, so it’s really terrific,” Trump said, before lining up next to Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and outgoing Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto to sign three copies of the deal – Trump using a black marker for his signature scrawl.
The signing came at the beginning of a packed two days of diplomacy for the American president that will conclude with high-stakes talks Dec. 1 with Chinese President Xi Jinping on ways to ease an escalating trade war between the two countries.
“There’s some good signs,” Trump said. “We’ll see what happens.”
For the new North American trade deal, legislative approval is the next step. That could prove a difficult task in the United States, especially now that Democrats – instead of Trump’s Republicans – will control the House come January. Democrats and their allies in the labor movement are already demanding changes.
Within hours of the signing, Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer said the deal must have stronger labor and environmental protections in order to get majority support in Congress and “must prove to be a net benefit to middle-class families and working people.”
Democratic House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi – who is seeking to become House speaker in the new year – quipped, “The trade agreement formerly known as Prince – no, I mean, formerly known as NAFTA, is a work in progress.” Still, Trump projected confidence, saying: “It’s been so well reviewed I don’t expect to have very much of a problem.”
Trump is describing USMCA as a landmark trade agreement. But most companies are just relieved that it largely preserves the status quo established by NAFTA: a regional trade bloc that allows most products to travel between the United States, Canada and Mexico duty free. During the negotiations, Trump repeatedly threatened to pullout, a move that would have disrupted businesses that have built complicated supply chains that straddle the borders of the three countries.
The new agreement does make some changes to the way business is done in North America. It updates the trade pact to reflect the rise of the digital economy since the original NAFTA took effect nearly a quarter century ago. It gives U.S. dairy farmers a bit more access to the protected Canadian market.
The biggest changes target the auto industry. The new deal encourages auto companies to invest or expand in the United States and Canada, not low-wage Mexico, by requiring that 40 percent of cars be made where auto workers earn at least $16 an hour; otherwise, the cars won’t qualify for USMCA’s duty-free treatment.
Trudeau said the deal “lifts the risk of serious economic uncertainty” and said Canada worked hard for a “new, modernized agreement.” But he also used the ceremony to call on Trump to remove steel and aluminum tariffs the U.S. slapped on Canada and Mexico. Trudeau also referenced recent downsizing moves by GM in North America as a “heavy blow.”
Pena Nieto, who will hand off to his successor, said he was honored to be at the signing on the final day of his administration, calling it the culmination of a long process “that allow us to overcome differences and to conciliate our visions.”
Before Trump arrived in Argentina he injected additional drama into the proceedings by canceling a planned meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin. Also of interest was whether Trump would have an encounter with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, who was attending amid global dismay over the murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi.
Trump gathered with the leaders for a traditional group photo, but did not appear to acknowledge Putin or the crown prince as he walked by. A senior White House official said Trump and bin Salman exchanged pleasantries during a subsequent leaders’ session. The official spoke on condition of anonymity due to the sensitive nature of the crown prince’s situation.
Trump told reporters later: “We had no discussion. We might, but we had none.”
The president insisted he canceled his meeting with Putin because of Russia’s actions in Ukraine and not because of the federal investigation into Russian interference in his own election.
White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders made the same point: “On the basis of what took place with respect to the ships and the sailors, that was the sole reason.”
Trump announced via Twitter Nov. 29 that he was canceling the planned meeting with Putin over Russia’s seizure of Ukrainian vessels. The abrupt announcement came not long after his former lawyer, Michael Cohen, admitted lying to Congress to cover up that he was negotiating a real estate deal in Moscow on Trump’s behalf during the Republican presidential primary in 2016.
The news ensured any meeting with Putin would have put a spotlight on the U.S. special counsel’s investigation into whether the Trump campaign colluded with Moscow during the election. Trump has denied any wrongdoing.
Russia’s foreign minister Sergey Lavrov called the cancellation a missed opportunity, saying in remarks from Buenos Aires that were carried by Russian state television that he doubted “this move would help settling a number of important international problems.” He added: “Love can’t be forced.”
Trump opened Nov. 30 with a cordial meeting at the Casa Rosada with Argentine President Mauricio Macri, a longtime business acquaintance. Posing for photos in the gilded Salon Blanco, Trump said they would discuss trade, military purchases and other issues.
The U.S. businessman-turned-politician noted he had worked with Macri’s father on real estate developments and joked that when he and Macri first met they’d never have imagined their future roles on the world stage.

Keystone XL Pipeline Builder Asks Judge To Allow Some Pre-Construction Works

Helena, Mont. (AP) – The company that wants to build the Keystone XL pipeline is asking a judge to change his order blocking the project to allow pre-construction work to continue, such as purchasing materials and finalizing contracts.
Attorneys for the company will argue in a telephone conference that U.S. District Judge Brian Morris should clarify or amend his ruling to say the injunction does not apply to activities such as finalizing contracts, purchasing materials, conducting land surveys and discussing federal permits.
TransCanada wants to keep that preliminary work on track so that the Calgary-based company can be prepared to start pipeline construction as early as mid-February.
Blocking the pre-construction work even for several weeks would likely cause the company to miss the entire 2019 construction season and delay its 2021 target for oil to start flowing through the pipeline.
“A one-year delay in construction of the pipeline would result in substantial harm to TransCanada, as well was to United States workers, and to TransCanada’s customers relying on the current in-service date of the project,” TransCanada Pipelines Limited Senior Vice President Norrie Ramsay said in a written statement to the court.
A year-long delay would cost TransCanada $949 million in earnings and put off the hiring of about 6,600 workers for construction, Ramsay said.
On Nov. 8, Morris blocked TransCanada’s permit to build the pipeline from Alberta’s oil sands through a half-dozen U.S. states to the Gulf of Mexico.
The judge had ruled the Trump administration had not fully considered the environmental effects of the pipeline.
TransCanada’s attorneys say the company is considering appealing Morris’ order. Ramsay also estimates that it could take as long as the first quarter of 2019 for federal agencies to complete the review that Morris ordered.
One group that sued to block the pipeline project, the Northern Plains Resource Council, declined comment on TransCanada’s request, spokesman Dustin Ogdin said.
The attorney for another plaintiff, Indigenous Environmental Network, did not respond to a voicemail requesting comment.

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 49,400

Texas 22,600. 71 over 600 lbs. 45 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 550-600 lbs 157.75; 650-700 lbs 147.50-153.50; 700-750 lbs 153.00-154.00; 750-800 lbs 145.00-149.49; ; 800-850 lbs 154.96; 850-900 lbs 148.43; Current Del 650-700 lbs 154.00; Dec FOB 700-750 lbs 158.97; Jan FOB 700-750 lbs 155.97; 800-850 lbs 141.80; Jan Del 750-800 lbs 136.75. Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB 550-600 lbs 152.35; 600-650 lbs 146.02; 650-700 lbs 152.50; 700-750 lbs 141.01-146.42; 750-800 lbs 141.27-149.86; 850-900 lbs 140.45-142.45; Current Del 600-650 lbs 148.00; 800-850 lbs 144.00-148.00; 850-900 lbs 149.00; 900-950 lbs 142.00; Dec FOB 700-750 lbs 146.27-148.74; 750-800 lbs 138.79; Dec Del 550-600 lbs 140.50 Mex. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 500-550 lbs 149.50; 550-600 lbs 148.00; 600-650 lbs 145.50-150.75; 700-750 lbs 139.00-144.00; 750-800 lbs 143.50-146.96; Current Del 500-550 lbs 154.00; Jan FOB 700-750 lbs 137.80; Jan Del 700-750 lbs 136.75-139.95; Feb Del 700-750 lbs 129.75-134.25; Mar Del 700-750 lbs 131.40; Apr Del 700-750 lbs 129.27. Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB 500-550 lbs 138.35; 550-600 lbs 139.02-146.27; 600-650 lbs 138.00-147.50; 650-700 lbs 140.00; 700-750 lbs 141.27-143.71; 750-800 lbs 133.51-138.62; Current Del 600-650 lbs 141.00; 650-700 lbs 145.00; 700-750 lbs 145.00; 750-800 lbs 144.00; Dec FOB 650-700 lbs 143.74; 700-750 lbs 138.12; 750-800 lbs 131.79; Dec Del 550-600 lbs 132.00 Mex; 750-800 lbs 138.00.

Oklahoma 4700. 99 over 600 lbs. 39 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 650-700 lbs 150.50; 750-800 lbs 148.00; 800-850 lbs 153.50; Dec FOB 800-850 lbs 153.50. Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB 700-750 lbs 142.63. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 500-550 lbs 150.50; 700-750 lbs 141.91-144.00; 750-800 lbs 140.59; 800-850 lbs 136.59; Current Del 700-750 lbs 145.00; 750-800 lbs 139.52; Jan FOB 700-750 lbs 138.10. Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB 700-750 lbs 127.90; Apr FOB 700-750 lbs 125.77.

New Mexico 800. 98 over 600 lbs. 65 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB 600-650 lbs 146.61; 800-850 lbs 142.38-146.72. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 600-650 lbs 148.00. Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB 600-650 lbs 139.61; 750-800 lbs 142.38; Dec FOB 750-800 lbs 137.48.

Kansas 5600. 100 over 600 lbs. 30 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 800-850 lbs 150.94; 850-900 lbs 143.70-143.75; 900-950 lbs 146.35; 900-950 lbs 144.91; Current Del 750-800 lbs 149.00; 850-900 lbs 150.50. Medium and Large 1-2 Current Del 650-700 lbs 147.00; 700-750 lbs 146.00-149.00; 750-800 lbs 146.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 650-700 lbs 153.00; 750-800 lbs 141.50-144.80; 800-850 lbs 141.91; Current Del 750-800 lbs 142.00. Medium and Large 1-2 Jan FOB 700-750 lbs 138.95; Current Del 750-800 lbs 137.00.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — November 30
National feeder cattle receipts: 289,500

Steers and heifers sold steady to $3 higher. Receipts were much larger due to most livestock auctions observing the Thanksgiving Day holiday. Buyers have become more meticulous when purchasing calves having a health program and ample time of being weaned this time of year. In times past, a 30 to 45 day weaning period was sufficient, however buyers are now almost demanding a calf that is 60 days weaned with at least two rounds of recent vaccinations. Also, this time of year fleshy calves coming off the cows are seeing a steep price discount and several 550 plus pound calves weaned on the trailer have made their way to town. Blizzard conditions on Nov. 25-26 from basically I-70 to I-80 did harden up some of the fleshy calves as cold temperatures moved in directly after the snow dumped across the Plains. Mud will become an issue rather quickly due to the soil underneath not being frozen. Most of the forthcoming problems will be when the snow melts and muddy lots will be prevalent. Feeder cattle futures have tried to find a positive footing in recent weeks and there have been large swings from one week to the next. Feeder Cattle futures were $2.15-4.15 lower even though livestock auctions were steady to higher. Nov. 21 friendly Cattle on Feed Report failed to give support as well as Nov. 23 higher feed cattle market. Nov. 26, Tri-State Livestock Auction in McCook, Nebraska sold 3 loads of heifers that went to feed weighing 785 lbs sold at $157. After Nov. 23’s higher fed cattle trade in the Southern Plains at $116-117, trading has been slow to materialize in that area. Early sales in Nebraska have been $1-2 lower with the bulk of sales at $183-184. Another winter storm is forecasted to move through the Northern Plains and some feeders are content at this time to have cattle sold before the brunt of the storm rolls through.

Texas 7200. 48 pct over 600 lbs. 48 pct heifers. 400-450 lbs (420) 176.12; 450-500 lbs (481) 163.58; 500-550 lbs (528) 161.83; 550-600 lbs (568) 157.16; 600-650 lbs (626) 147.11; 650-700 lbs (675) 139.64; 700-750 lbs (711) 142.87; 750-800 lbs (785) 137.59; 800-850 lbs (828) 132.18; pkg 850 lbs 145.50; 900-950 lbs (945) 136.90. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (418) 169.09; 450-500 lbs (464) 154.06; 500-550 lbs (532) 141.11; 550-600 lbs (578) 142.01; 600-650 lbs (631) 130.41; 650-700 lbs (670) 134.89; 700-750 lbs (728) 122.11; 750-800 lbs (770) 139.94; 800-850 lbs (820) 116.01. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (335) 187.42; 350-400 lbs (372) 173.46; 400-450 lbs (431) 158.39; 450-500 lbs (477) 148.30; 500-550 lbs (518) 142.90; 550-600 lbs (573) 138.97; 600-650 lbs (632) 135.94; 650-700 lbs (668) 137.97; 700-750 lbs (716) 140.68; 750-800 lbs (755) 134.26. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (387) 149.25; 400-450 lbs (427) 148.52; 450-500 lbs (477) 132.46; 500-550 lbs (528) 122.92; 550-600 lbs (576) 123.25; 600-650 lbs (629) 117.91; 650-700 lbs (662) 119.94; 700-750 lbs (722) 115.70.

Oklahoma 43,800. 44 pct over 600 lbs. 41 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (331) 197.50; 350-400 lbs (378) 190.52; 400-450 lbs (418) 188.92; 450-500 lbs (473) 177.88; 500-550 lbs (523) 167.14; 550-600 lbs (569) 158.39; 600-650 lbs (620) 150.51; 650-700 lbs (673) 146.84; 700-750 lbs (720) 144.83; 750-800 lbs (774) 147.95; 800-850 lbs (822) 147.69; 850-900 lbs (865) 150.26; 900-950 lbs (915) 144.20; 950-1000 lbs (957) 137.08; few loads 1061 lbs 145.75; Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (337) 187.41; 350-400 lbs (376) 178.43; 400-450 lbs (433) 173.53; 450-500 lbs (474) 167.65; 500-550 lbs (526) 158.39; 550-600 lbs (574) 148.52; 600-650 lbs (628) 138.83; 650-700 lbs (677) 141.25; 700-750 lbs (722) 140.58; 750-800 lbs (776) 142.93; 800-850 lbs (826) 143.70; 850-900 lbs (869) 145.08; Holstein Steers: Large 3 part load 581 lbs 74.50; Heifers: Medium and Large 1 250-300 lbs (280) 170.73; 300-350 lbs (328) 164.04; 350-400 lbs (380) 158.37; 400-450 lbs (424) 153.47; 450-500 lbs (472) 148.07; 500-550 lbs (524) 142.27; 550-600 lbs (570) 135.13; 600-650 lbs (627) 140.42; 650-700 lbs (671) 138.97; 700-750 lbs (729) 141.56; 750-800 lbs (782) 140.15; 800-850 lbs (815) 137.30; 850-900 lbs (870) 135.25; Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (328) 152.58; 350-400 lbs (377) 149.05; 400-450 lbs (424) 142.77; 450-500 lbs (475) 139.06; 500-550 lbs (523) 134.82; 550-600 lbs (577) 130.29; 600-650 lbs (624) 128.65; 650-700 lbs (671) 131.65; 700-750 lbs (729) 198.52; 750-800 lbs (772) 130.95;

New Mexico 7000. 30 pct over 600 lbs. 46 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (371) 194.68; 400-450 lbs (421) 186.10; 450-500 lbs (476) 180.02; 500-550 lbs (520) 163.85; 550-600 lbs (580) 150.64; 600-650 lbs (617) 144.90. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (325) 195.35; 350-400 lbs (380) 184.22; 400-450 lbs (427) 178.16; 450-500 lbs (465) 175.48; 500-550 lbs (537) 152.24; 550-600 lbs (577) 147.24. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (314) 172.34; 350-400 lbs (370) 170.04; 400-450 lbs (421) 156.72; 450-500 lbs (471) 146.65; 500-550 lbs (524) 143.55; 550-600 lbs (576) 134.79; 650-700 lbs (660) 133.14. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (381) 162.60; 400-450 lbs (434) 149.15; 450-500 lbs (472) 146.33; 500-550 lbs (520) 138.32.

Kansas 12,900. 67 pct over 600 lbs. 41 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 pkg 314 lbs 240.00; 350-400 lbs (386) 203.42; 400-450 lbs (427) 199.27; 450-500 lbs (460) 195.40; 500-550 lbs (523) 177.58; 550-600 lbs (574) 166.62; 600-650 lbs (631) 157.39; 650-700 lbs (678) 150.62; 700-750 lbs (724) 150.42; 750-800 lbs (783) 146.33; 800-850 lbs (822) 146.17; 850-900 lbs (874) 147.56; 900-950 lbs (915) 145.25; 950-1000 lbs (974) 142.43. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (420) 171.43; 450-500 lbs (480) 163.30; 500-550 lbs (535) 158.31; 550-600 lbs (578) 152.99; 600-650 lbs (619) 150.99; 650-700 lbs (667) 141.48; 700-750 lbs (725) 139.40; 750-800 lbs (777) 140.19; 800-850 lbs (831) 142.98; 850-900 lbs (868) 139.20; 950-1000 lbs (963) 135.32. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (424) 160.62; 450-500 lbs (479) 153.96; 500-550 lbs (529) 148.19; 550-600 lbs (561) 149.08; 600-650 lbs (628) 142.30; 650-700 lbs (680) 140.68; 700-750 lbs (733) 143.32; 750-800 lbs (772) 141.76; 800-850 lbs (819) 142.18; 850-900 lbs (872) 134.95; 900-950 lbs (911) 133.00; 950-1000 lbs (967) 125.33. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (432) 147.51; 450-500 lbs (494) 133.49; 500-550 lbs (521) 138.10; 550-600 lbs (575) 132.13; 600-650 lbs (619) 131.49.

Missouri 42,200. 49 pct over 600 lbs. 38 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 250-300 lbs (281) 161.43; 300-350 lbs (323) 159.99; 350-400 lbs (376) 176.52; 400-450 lbs (427) 178.38; 450-500 lbs (477) 172.39; 500-550 lbs (523) 166.10; 550-600 lbs (572) 158.65; 600-650 lbs (623) 151.98; 650-700 lbs (672) 152.32; 700-750 lbs (722) 150.73; 750-800 lbs (774) 150.62; 800-850 lbs (823) 153.33; 850-900 lbs (873) 149.51; 900-950 lbs (929) 147.43; few loads 1032 lbs 133.60. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (326) 165.21; 350-400 lbs (375) 163.85; 400-450 lbs (428) 166.13; 450-500 lbs (473) 158.45; 500-550 lbs (530) 157.18; 550-600 lbs (574) 150.39; 600-650 lbs (625) 144.83; 650-700 lbs (673) 142.71; 700-750 lbs (721) 143.29; 750-800 lbs (767) 144.14; 800-850 lbs (823) 142.59; 850-900 lbs (873) 144.30; 900-950 lbs (916) 142.66. Holstein Steers: Large 3 400-450 lbs (428) 77.01; 500-550 lbs (525) 69.28; 550-600 lbs (582) 69.67; 600-650 lbs (629) 70.00; 800-850 lbs (827) 81.83; 1000-1050 lbs (1033) 61.51. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (329) 147.80; 350-400 lbs (378) 145.97; 400-450 lbs (429) 148.64; 450-500 lbs (476) 143.86; 500-550 lbs (523) 140.09; 550-600 lbs (573) 139.06; 600-650 lbs (623) 137.73; 650-700 lbs (677) 140.69; 700-750 lbs (724) 140.14; 750-800 lbs (771) 141.70; 800-850 lbs (821) 137.60; 850-900 lbs (882) 139.44. Medium and Large 1-2 250-300 lbs (289) 148.04; 300-350 lbs (325) 145.24; 350-400 lbs (374) 146.35; 400-450 lbs (426) 139.63; 450-500 lbs (474) 137.37; 500-550 lbs (525) 133.69; 550-600 lbs (572) 131.41; 600-650 lbs (619) 129.95; 650-700 lbs (672) 132.01; 700-750 lbs (719) 132.75; 750-800 lbs (782) 134.73; 800-850 lbs (822) 133.11; 850-900 lbs (854) 132.36.

Arkansas 10,500. 23 pct over 600 lbs. 45 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (325) 192.54; 350-400 lbs (376) 175.84; 400-450 lbs (423) 170.30; 450-500 lbs (470) 163.05; 500-550 lbs (520) 157.77; 550-600 lbs (571) 146.16; 600-650 lbs (621) 138.45; 650-700 lbs (678) 136.32. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (325) 149.27; 350-400 lbs (374) 149.04; 400-450 lbs (426) 144.38; 450-500 lbs (474) 137.60; 500-550 lbs (520) 132.62; 550-600 lbs (573) 129.15; 600-650 lbs (622) 128.77; 650-700 lbs (666) 122.11.

 

 

 

 

 

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Thursday, December 6, 2018 1:24 PM