Cattlemen Set Annual Convention For March 29-31

Fort Worth, Texas – The Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association (TSCRA) announced details of their annual Cattle Raisers Convention and Expo, to be held March 29-31, 2019, at the Fort Worth Convention Center.
The 2019 Cattle Raisers Convention and Expo is the largest ranching event of the year in the Southwestern United States. It will feature programs and activities of interest to cattle raisers, landowners and the general public, with opportunities for everyone to participate.
“If you own land or livestock in Texas or the Southwest, the Cattle Raisers Convention is an excellent investment of your time,” said TSCRA President Robert McKnight Jr. “I am confident you will find opportunities to further your education, gain industry information, make useful business connections and have some fun.”
Ranchers are invited to attend professional development classes offering practical education at the beginner and advanced levels. This year’s School for Successful Ranching will offer learning sessions and live demonstrations on topics including cattle health, legal issues, range and pasture management and marketing.
Two evening classes are being offered in 2019. On Thursday, March 28, at 6 p.m., the Ranch to Retail Workshop will showcase how beef carcasses are transformed into the retail cuts valued by consumers. The second workshop will be Friday, March 29, at 6 p.m. and offers in-depth livestock handling instruction from stockmanship and stewardship expert Curt Pate.
This year will feature the largest Expo in the history of the Cattle Raisers Convention with more than 250 booths offering a vast array of ranching supplies, services, jewelry, clothing, local food and more.
Industry experts will also be on hand for a variety of information sessions on issues that have a direct impact on cattle raisers, landowners and consumers. Included in these sessions will be updates on federal and state legislation, international trade, an explanation of how Alexa, Siri and now “Chuck” are changing the way consumers find health and nutrition information, and efforts to reform Texas’ eminent domain laws.
Much more is on the agenda, and registration is now open. Visit www.CattleRaisersConvention.com for more information and to register to attend and reserve hotel rooms at the headquarters hotels.

Purdue Economists Say Agriculture Still Benefits If U.S. Re-enters TPP

By Todd Neeley
DTN Staff Reporter

Omaha (DTN) – Backing out of the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP), renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), an ongoing trade battle with China and resulting retaliatory tariffs against the United States are all trade policies that are costing U.S. farmers dearly, according to an updated Purdue University analysis released.
An initial analysis was completed by Purdue economists Maksym Chepeliev, Wallace E. Tyner and Dominique van der Mensbrugghe in October 2018. The updated study said a U.S. re-entry into TPP would turn a current agriculture trade loss into a gain. In addition, the study says that backing out of NAFTA and failure to implement the USMCA, would lead to an additional $12 billion in annual losses in agriculture export revenues.
After the U.S. pulled out of the TPP, the remaining 11 countries including Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam, negotiated the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership.
Speaking at a Farm Foundation event in Washington, D.C., Don Buckingham, an attorney with the Canadian Agrifood Policy Institute, said work done between the U.S. and Canada on trade agreements laid the groundwork for a possible re-entry of the U.S. into the TPP.
“Obviously it’s nice to be in the club,” Buckingham said.
“How do we determine a fair entry point? There is a market dynamic to take into consideration. A lot of provisions in the USMCA were first negotiated in TPP. In agriculture there is always sensitive sectors. It is always difficult . That may be where negotiation bogs down.”
The Purdue analysis said there still would be a significant benefit to the U.S. if it joined that partnership. If the U.S. continues its current trade stance, however, U.S. agriculture exports would continue to fall in the next four to five years.
“If the United States were to rejoin the TPP, the agreement would significantly benefit U.S. farmers – the loss of $1.4 billion would turn into a gain of $2.9 billion in additional agricultural exports,” the report said.
“If the current U.S. trade policy were to continue towards protectionism (i.e., with the U.S. withdrawal from TPP, with the global retaliatory tariffs and if the United States were to entirely withdraw from NAFTA), U.S. agricultural exports would drop by $21.8 billion. These negative trade impacts would be reflected in lower incomes for U.S. farmers, reduced agricultural land returns and farm labor displacement.”
The study said that, on average, the loss of those exports would lead to a reduction in income for workers in the agricultural and food sectors of about $4,000 per person.
“This scenario would also result in an aggregate welfare loss of $42.5 billion to the U.S. economy, or over $500 per U.S. household,” the analysis found.
“What does all this mean? It suggests that U.S. agriculture is entering a volatile period in international trade. The data suggests the sector currently risks losing much of the trade gains achieved over the past three decades. The analysis predicts that if the USMCA is approved, if the trade war ends and if the United States rejoins TPP, U.S. agriculture could see not only the gains of the past decades reinforced, but could also realize the potential for additional trade gains.”
Purdue economists said if the U.S. joins the TPP agreement with the other 11 countries, U.S. food and agriculture exports would increase by around $2.9 billion annually.
“Dairy products experience the largest relative increase in exports at 17.5%, which is equivalent to $1 billion,” the study said. “Similar increase in export values – around $1.1 billion – is observed in other food products sector, while exports of other agriculture and all other food products grow between $600 million and $700 million.”
NAFTA, USMCA
Though Congress is expected to vote on USMCA sometime in April, Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives have indicated they may make changes to the agreement before approving.
“In summary, for the U.S. food and agriculture sector, the current shape of trade policies, including steel and aluminum tariffs and the corresponding retaliatory tariffs, is leading towards an export loss of $9.8 billion, with slight gains from the USMCA notwithstanding,” the analysis concludes.
No matter the outcome, the economists said agriculture already may have suffered lasting trade damage.
“Even if the trade liberalization situation transpires, there may be a lasting impact to U.S. agriculture export markets, as newcomers solidify their newly acquired market access,” the report said.
Retaliatory tariffs implemented by Canada and Mexico after the U.S. imposed 25% and 10% tariffs on steel and aluminum imports erased any U.S. gains expected from the USMCA, according to the analysis.
“The retaliatory tariffs implemented by Canada and Mexico on U.S. agricultural exports will reverse the modest export gains from USMCA – a decline of $1.8 billion (annually) rather than a gain of $454 million,” the economists said.
“In a broader trade context, with all measures and counter-measures (including tariff retaliation by China and the European Union), U.S. agricultural exports will decline by around $8.4 billion.”
In moving away from a policy of multi-lateral free trade toward protectionist policies, the Trump administration’s actions on trade are “likely to have significant implications for U.S. farmers as these actions target three of the largest markets for U.S. agricultural exports – Canada, China and Mexico – accounting for some 44%, and representing an average of $63 billion of U.S. agricultural exports 2013 to 2015,” the economists said.
SPECIFIC SECTORS
The Purdue study examined the effects of trade policy on particular segments of agriculture. In particular, the study said it would lead to a loss in agriculture land values and significant losses in exports from terminating (instead of replacing) NAFTA.
“With falling output and decreasing demand for land, land prices decline by 1.6% in the ‘raw milk’ sector and by around 1% in the ‘other agriculture,’’’ the analysis said.
“The quantitative assessment shows that the termination of NAFTA would result in an aggregate U.S. agricultural and food exports drop of over $12 billion (annually).”
That termination would lead to an estimated decline in pork and poultry exports by about 35%, or around $4.6 billion; dairy products by about 16%, or $950 million and other food products by about 15%, or $4.9 billion.

U.S. Wins WTO Case vs. China

By Chris Clayton
DTN Ag Policy Editor

Omaha (DTN) – U.S. wheat and rice farmers got a big win over China announced Feb. 28 by the World Trade Organization’s dispute settlement panel. But the victory could be short-lived because the Trump administration has made it harder for the WTO to resolve major trade cases.
The WTO dispute settlement panel found China’s subsidies for wheat and rice from 2012-2015 exceeded its terms under the WTO, as the U.S. alleged when the allegations were first made in late 2016. The panel ruled on rice and wheat subsidies, but did not rule on corn, which was also part of the case. The Obama administration initially filed two cases claiming China was illegally subsidizing its farmers by as much as $100 billion.
U.S. officials and agricultural groups declared victory with the WTO’s findings. They noted China’s domestic supports for grains distorted markets and created incentives for more Chinese production of those crops, reducing imports in the process.
“The United States proved that China for years provided government support for its grain producers far in excess of the levels China agreed to when it joined the WTO,” said U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer. “China’s excessive support limits opportunities for U.S. farmers to export their world-class products to China. We expect China to quickly come into compliance with its WTO obligations.”
House Agriculture Committee Chairman Collin Peterson, D-Minn., also noted the ruling as “a huge win at a time when such wins are sorely needed. It should enable a fairer playing field and allow our farmers to focus on farming. I hope the panel will issue a similar ruling on Chinese corn subsidies, but it’s also my hope that this ruling can help our negotiators reach a positive path forward to reopen trade with China and reclaim the markets that the trade war has cost our farmers.”
Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman Pat Roberts, R-Kan., credited Lighthizer and his team for standing up for U.S. farmers.
“We play by international trade rules and must ensure other nations do too,” Roberts said. “Especially now, our farmers and ranchers need greater access to new and growing markets. This action will allow them to better compete in China.”
U.S. Wheat Associates also welcomed the decision and pointed to an Iowa State University study funded by the wheat industry that showed China’s domestic support price for wheat was nearly $10 a bushel, which cost wheat farmers as much as $700 million in income because of lost exports to China.
Due to that high domestic price, U.S. Wheat Associates noted, USDA shows that China will hold 140 million metric tons of wheat (5.1 billion bushels) for ending stocks by June.
However, the victory with the dispute settlement panel might be fleeting. That’s because the Trump administration keeps blocking the appointment of appeals court judges to the WTO.
As Bloomberg reported, the Trump administration’s moves to block WTO appellate judges has dropped the WTO appellate panel from seven judges down to three, the minimum it can have to hear an appeal. China could negotiate any remedy with the U.S. as part of the ongoing trade talks, but if China appeals the WTO ruling, the case would reflect just how gridlocked the WTO has become in settling cases. Bloomberg noted the WTO panel won’t have enough judges to function by mid-December unless new judges are appointed.
Ben Conner, the vice president of policy at the Washington-based U.S. Wheat Associates, told Bloomberg, “The entire global trading system and the WTO dispute resolution process have been good for U.S. agriculture.” If the U.S. agricultural cases are appealed, they “could be among the first to get stuck in legal limbo without a functioning appellate body.”
U.S. Wheat Associates agreed with another statement in the Bloomberg article: “In the absence of an appellate ruling, the WTO’s decision won’t be binding and the WTO cannot require China to change its subsidy programs.”

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 63,400

Texas 35,200. 94 over 600 lbs. 39 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 650-700 lbs 142.00; 700-750 lbs 140.00; 750-800 lbs 137.00-139.69; 800-850 lbs 134.00-139.00; 850-900 lbs 128.00-137.00; 900-950 lbs 126.00; Current Del 750-800 lbs 141.00-142.00; 800-850 lbs 138.00-140.00; 850-900 lbs 134.50-138.00; 900-950 lbs 138.00; Apr FOB 750-800 lbs 138.75; May FOB 750-800 lbs 140.30; Mar-Apr Del 800-850 lbs 138.50; Apr Del 800-850 lbs 139.00; May Del 800-850 lbs 143.85-145.50; June Del 700-750 lbs 147.50; July Del 750-800 lbs 148.25; Aug Del 600-650 lbs 164.00; 750-800 lbs 148.25-152.70; Sept Del 750-800 lbs 149.10; Oct Del 750-800 lbs 149.50. Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB 700-750 lbs 138.14-139.59; 750-800 lbs 135.63-138.40; 800-850 lbs 131.34-132.64; 850-900 lbs 132.33; Current Del 550-600 lbs 154.00-154.50 Mex; 650-700 lbs 148.00; 700-750 lbs 145.00-147.00; 750-800 lbs 140.00; 800-850 lbs 135.50-140.00; 850-900 lbs 133.00-139.00; June FOB 700-750 lbs 150.11. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 650-700 lbs 134.00; 700-750 lbs 129.00-135.00; 750-800 lbs 127.00-134.91; Current Del 700-750 lbs 132.00-135.50; 750-800 lbs 132.85-134.00; Apr FOB 750-800 lbs 128.00; May FOB 700-750 lbs 133.60; June FOB 600-650 lbs 145.00; 700-750 lbs 137.00; Mar-Apr Del 750-800 lbs 133.00; Apr Del 750-800 lbs 137.25; May Del 650-700 lbs 143.50; 700-750 lbs 133.50-140.50; 750-800 lbs 137.00; June Del 700-750 lbs 137.50; July Del 700-750 lbs 140.32. Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB 650-700 lbs 137.91; 700-750 lbs 127.91-133.41; 750-800 lbs 125.91-128.33; Current Del 650-700 lbs 138.00; 700-750 lbs 135.26; 750-800 lbs 131.00-134.00; 800-850 lbs 134.00.

Oklahoma 8500. 97 over 600 lbs. 34 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 750-800 lbs 138.00-139.06; 800-850 lbs 134.88-139.00; 850-900 lbs 133.00-135.00; 900-950 lbs 137.00; May FOB 800-850 lbs 140.85-143.50; July FOB 750-800 lbs 145.25; Aug FOB 600-650 lbs 161.00; 750-800 lbs 145.25; Sept FOB 750-800 lbs 146.10; Oct FOB 750-800 lbs 146.50. Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB 750-800 lbs 135.14; 850-900 lbs 131.50. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 600-650 lbs 147.00; 700-750 lbs 130.00-133.61; 750-800 lbs 130.00-130.60; 800-850 lbs 124.36-126.38; Mar FOB 500-550 lbs 145.00; May FOB 700-750 lbs 137.50; July FOB 700-750 lbs 137.32.

New Mexico 1900. 20 over 600 lbs. 0 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 750-800 lbs 139.00; 800-850 lbs 137.00-139.34. Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB 550-600 lbs 148.00 Mex; 800-850 lbs 136.22.

Kansas 4100. 100 over 600 lbs. 32 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 750-800 lbs 142.81; 800-850 lbs 137.00-137.81; 850-900 lbs 133.75-135.00; Aug FOB 750-800 lbs 149.70; Current Del 750-800 lbs 141.00; 850-900 lbs 136.50. Medium and Large 1-2 Current Del 750-800 lbs 137.00; 800-850 lbs 137.00; 850-900 lbs 132.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current FOB 700-750 lbs 129.81-130.95; 750-800 lbs 129.50-131.67; Apr FOB 750-800 lbs 134.25; Current Del 800-850 lbs 129.00. Medium and Large 1-2 Current Del 800-850 lbs 126.00.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — March 8
National feeder cattle receipts: 204,000

Steers and heifers sold steady to $5 higher, with gains seen both in calves suitable for grazing as well as cattle suitable for direct feedlot placement. Where feeder cattle come from does make a difference on flesh condition. If an area has been inundated with winter moisture and harsher than normal temperatures, cattle have hardened up and are in lighter flesh than their counterparts that come from drier environments such as Northeast Colorado. Auction receipts were curtailed on this report due to very cold weather which hampered movement. Three of the previous four weeks, Live Cattle futures have been higher when comparing March 1 close to March 1 close. The LC contracts just couldn’t seem to gain any momentum. Fresh bullish news appears to be few and far between as feedyards are hoping to get winter behind them in a hurry as the calendar how now turned to March. Omaha is reporting that they have received over 60 inches of snow this year and more moisture is expected. Northeast Nebraska feedyard personnel are getting tired of this winter as the pens are muddy and cattle performance is down. Cattle are not meeting projections so far in the first quarter and just how much damage is done to meat production remains to be seen. However, the World Agriculture Outlook Board released the monthly WASDE report March 8 and is lowering the 2019 annual beef production by 310 million pounds. After last month’s revision on beef production, they are estimating that a full week of beef production will be taken out due to lower first quarter slaughter, slowed placements and lighter carcass weights. Steer carcass weights for week ending February 23 were reported at 874 pounds, 5 pounds lower than March 1 and 9 pounds lower than a year ago. In the last 8 weeks, steer carcass weights have lost 22 pounds and the season for calf-feds coming out is still a month or so away. Negotiated cash fed cattle trading occurred on March 7 instead the typical March 1 for the last month or so. Live purchases were steady with March 1 at $128 in the Southern and Northern Plains, while the Nebraska dressed market was also steady at $205. Cold Storage Report for January was released with total red meat supplies in freezers up 7 percent from previous month and down 1 percent from last year. Total lbs of beef in freezers were up 3 percent at 510.1 million lbs from previous month and up 2 percent from last year. Frozen pork supplies were up 11 percent at 562.7 million lbs from last month, but 3 percent lower than last year. Year-end beef exports were reported at record volume and value for 2018. US beef exports were pegged at 1.35 million metric tons, up 7 percent from 2017 and 5 percent larger than the previous record in 2011. The Cattle-on-Feed for February 1 released March 8 was mostly within industry guesses and would be viewed as a neutral report. On Feed reported at 100 percent of a year ago; Placements at 95 percent and Marketings at 103 percent.

Texas 5900. 75 pct over 600 lbs. 38 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 500-550 lbs (509) 177.24; 550-600 lbs (564) 161.25; 600-650 lbs (631) 153.66; 650-700 lbs (668) 149.32; 700-750 lbs (718) 141.25; 750-800 lbs (763) 141.25; 800-850 lbs (829) 136.03; 850-900 lbs (864) 134.34; 900-950 lbs (920) 128.71. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (431) 176.52; 550-600 lbs (578) 155.56; 600-650 lbs (625) 148.76; 650-700 lbs (693) 140.41; 700-750 lbs (738) 133.11; 750-800 lbs (781) 136.56; 800-850 lbs (815) 129.85; few loads 953 lbs 125.50. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (385) 161.79; 450-500 lbs (480) 154.85; 500-550 lbs (540) 146.10; 600-650 lbs (642) 133.33; 650-700 lbs (679) 132.84; 700-750 lbs (715) 129.34; 750-800 lbs (777) 127.26; 800-850 lbs (822) 125.49; part load 883 lbs 121.00. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (390) 153.26; 400-450 lbs (433) 147.55; 500-550 lbs (531) 136.56; 550-600 lbs (568) 133.28; 600-650 lbs (625) 133.42; 700-750 lbs (714) 121.15; 800-850 lbs (816) 121.47.

Oklahoma 20,300. 79 pct over 600 lbs. 39 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 250-300 lbs (274) 222.83; 300-350 lbs (320) 205.68; 350-400 lbs (378) 196.44; 400-450 lbs (426) 195.05; 450-500 lbs (471) 191.37; 500-550 lbs (522) 177.12; 550-600 lbs (568) 168.15; 600-650 lbs (627) 158.03; 650-700 lbs (674) 148.11; 700-750 lbs (720) 143.92; 750-800 lbs (779) 139.58; 800-850 lbs (827) 135.76; 850-900 lbs (876) 132.54; 900-950 lbs (916) 130.17; 950-1000 lbs (983) 124.75; 1000-1050 lbs (1016) 123.53; 1050-1100 lbs (1074) 124.67. Medium and Large 1-2 450-500 lbs (480) 181.08; 500-550 lbs (525) 171.12; 550-600 lbs (579) 161.45; 600-650 lbs (621) 143.48; 650-700 lbs (666) 144.37; 700-750 lbs (721) 138.78; 750-800 lbs (781) 134.23; 800-850 lbs (823) 130.44; 850-900 lbs (864) 130.15; 900-950 lbs (927) 127.01; 950-1000 lbs (979) 126.05. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (325) 169.08; 350-400 lbs (378) 165.35; 400-450 lbs (425) 162.06; 450-500 lbs (480) 153.19; 500-550 lbs (521) 149.69; 550-600 lbs (574) 143.15; 600-650 lbs (629) 138.35; 650-700 lbs (670) 133.46; 700-750 lbs (724) 130.60; 750-800 lbs (779) 127.94; 800-850 lbs (818) 125.28; 850-900 lbs (876) 123.19; 900-950 lbs (930) 124.08; 950-1000 lbs (977) 121.23. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (381) 165.15; 450-500 lbs (486) 151.78; 500-550 lbs (527) 146.13; 550-600 lbs (585) 138.67; 600-650 lbs (640) 129.17; 650-700 lbs (675) 127.65; 700-750 lbs (737) 122.14; 750-800 lbs (775) 120.79.

New Mexico 5400. 37 pct over 600 lbs. 39 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (423) 191.16; 450-500 lbs (478) 180.15; 500-550 lbs (530) 164.62; 600-650 lbs (627) 148.24; 650-700 lbs (678) 145.25; 750-800 lbs (762) 138.03; 800-850 lbs (829) 132.87; 850-900 lbs (882) 130.91. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (415) 181.28; 450-500 lbs (477) 174.60; 500-550 lbs (530) 162.95; 550-600 lbs (564) 152.19; 600-650 lbs (626) 148.28; 800-850 lbs (812) 136.04. Holstein Steers: Large 3 500-550 lbs (509) 75.40. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (372) 172.16; 400-450 lbs (437) 163.86; 450-500 lbs (477) 157.87; 500-550 lbs (523) 145.44; 550-600 lbs (571) 138.22; 650-700 lbs (672) 132.88. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (389) 167.64; 400-450 lbs (436) 153.13; 600-650 lbs (627) 131.58.

Kansas 9200. 85 pct over 600 lbs. 37 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 450-500 lbs (486) 192.44; 500-550 lbs (526) 180.50; 550-600 lbs (582) 170.34; 600-650 lbs (622) 160.85; 650-700 lbs (670) 151.93; 700-750 lbs (721) 146.06; 750-800 lbs (775) 141.20; 800-850 lbs (827) 140.64; 850-900 lbs (874) 134.87; 900-950 lbs (917) 132.98; 950-1000 lbs (976) 128.10. Medium and Large 1-2 550-600 lbs (576) 152.92; 650-700 lbs (683) 150.39; 700-750 lbs (733) 140.00; 800-850 lbs (827) 133.11. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (375) 163.26; 500-550 lbs (524) 159.93; 550-600 lbs (576) 151.60; 600-650 lbs (624) 141.34; 650-700 lbs (675) 137.33; 700-750 lbs (723) 134.84; 750-800 lbs (777) 132.19; 800-850 lbs (823) 130.79; 850-900 lbs (865) 124.81; 900-950 lbs (905) 125.86. Medium and Large 1-2 550-600 lbs (584) 145.54; 600-650 lbs (628) 140.70; 650-700 lbs (673) 132.83; 700-750 lbs (725) 127.64; 750-800 lbs (768) 127.58.

Missouri 22,700. 56 pct over 600 lbs. 43 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (324) 196.04; 350-400 lbs (377) 202.88; 400-450 lbs (432) 192.74; 450-500 lbs (473) 192.57; 500-550 lbs (527) 179.00; 550-600 lbs (572) 172.13; 600-650 lbs (622) 160.33; 650-700 lbs (670) 154.61; 700-750 lbs (723) 149.50; 750-800 lbs (775) 142.14; 800-850 lbs (820) 138.21; 850-900 lbs (865) 135.20; 900-950 lbs (930) 128.23; 950-1000 lbs (951) 134.23. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (377) 181.66; 400-450 lbs (423) 177.55; 450-500 lbs (472) 169.95; 500-550 lbs (523) 166.05; 550-600 lbs (575) 158.36; 600-650 lbs (633) 152.81; 650-700 lbs (682) 148.85; 700-750 lbs (726) 139.52; 750-800 lbs (777) 135.28; 800-850 lbs (819) 127.04; 850-900 lbs (869) 130.39. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (314) 166.52; 350-400 lbs (381) 160.95; 400-450 lbs (427) 157.33; 450-500 lbs (476) 155.21; 500-550 lbs (523) 151.60; 550-600 lbs (579) 147.78; 600-650 lbs (627) 143.36; 650-700 lbs (673) 139.73; 700-750 lbs (717) 133.45; 750-800 lbs (766) 128.52; 800-850 lbs (819) 126.59; 850-900 lbs (886) 122.82. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (327) 151.41; 350-400 lbs (373) 154.11; 400-450 lbs (423) 148.04; 450-500 lbs (479) 147.26; 500-550 lbs (523) 142.06; 550-600 lbs (574) 142.52; 600-650 lbs (623) 137.12; 650-700 lbs (672) 128.70; 700-750 lbs (734) 130.37; 750-800 lbs (774) 121.83; 800-850 lbs (826) 125.65.

Arkansas 3800. 32 pct over 600 lbs. 49 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (323) 196.72; 350-400 lbs (370) 194.06; 400-450 lbs (419) 190.72; 450-500 lbs (469) 178.18; 500-550 lbs (522) 167.53; 550-600 lbs (574) 154.66; 600-650 lbs (615) 145.41; 650-700 lbs (658) 144.85. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (323) 167.15; 350-400 lbs (373) 163.36; 400-450 lbs (423) 156.80; 450-500 lbs (471) 153.59; 500-550 lbs (518) 146.69; 550-600 lbs (576) 140.51; 600-650 lbs (624) 133.25; 650-700 lbs (667) 129.41.

 

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday, March 13, 2019 10:58 AM